49 attorneys general propose amendment to aid human trafficking prosecutions

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49 attorneys general propose amendment to aid human trafficking prosecutions

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49 attorneys general are propsing an amendment to allow state and local officials to more easily prosecute human traffickers.

Read the full letter from 49 attorneys general to Congress

A group of 49 attorneys general across the country, including Nevada Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto, is calling on Congress to change the Communications Decency Act of 1996. 

They say the proposed amendment would allow state and local officials to more easily prosecute people who promote and profit from human trafficking.

The group sent a letter Tuesday asking federal lawmakers to revise the act, which was created during the infancy of the Internet before prostitution had largely moved online.

The group says that the law was intended to protect children from accessing indecent material on the web.

But more recently, they say that courts across the country have interpreted the law in ways that provide online classified ad sites with immunity from state punishment.

The letter names Backpage.com as a site used for the online solicitation of child prostitutes and references the specific example of a man in Miami who was arrested in March for advertising the sex services of a 13-year-old on that website.