New law will help track sale of cold meds used to make meth

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New law will help track sale of cold meds used to make meth

Pharmacy

A new state law will help pharmacies track the sale of over-the-counter cold and allergy medicines containing ingredients used to make meth.

A new state law will help pharmacies track the sale of over-the-counter cold and allergy medicines containing ingredients used to make meth.

Nevada is joining the National Precursor Log Exchange. It's a real-time, electronic logging system that allows pharmacies to track the sale of products with ingredients like pseudoephedrine. Pharmacies can then block those sales to people trying to surpass the legal limit.

Sergeant Ernesto Leyva with Reno Police says the federal government passed major restrictions on buying these medicines back in 2006 and the production of meth in Reno has decreased dramatically. But there's still a high demand for the drug.

"Just because the production of methamphetamine that was being conducted in motel rooms, garages, small places like that--we referred to them back in the day as the 'Beavis and Butthead'-type meth labs--those have gone way down; however, these same restrictions don't apply in Mexico.

Leyva says a lot of the meth being consumed in the area comes from Mexico. And even though federal law has helped curb smaller operations, Leyva says there's a new method popular in the East that requires minimal ingredients and infrastructure.

"There is another method out there that's called the 'One Pot Method.' It takes significantly less precursors to manufacture the methamphetamine, however the dangers of it still exist."

Those dangers include fires and explosions. Leyva says AB39 is important legislation because meth continues to be an issue for the community.