NV wants to designate 2,000 acres as critical habitat for rare plant

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NV wants to designate 2,000 acres as critical habitat for rare plant

Ivesiaphoto

The Nevada Fish & Wildlife Service wants to protect a plant called Webber's ivesia by categorizing it as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

The Nevada Fish & Wildlife Service wants to protect a plant called Webber's ivesia by categorizing it as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

Officials will hold a public meeting Tuesday to discuss more than 2,000 acres of land that they hope to designate as critical habitat, including parts of Washoe and Douglas counties.

Webber's ivesia is a yellow desert rose native to Nevada and California. Designating those areas as critical habitat would protect the plant from ongoing threats such as wildfires, invasive plants and urban development.

Nevada Fish & Wildlife Spokesperson Carolyn Wells says that the species is high on the department's priority list because the plant is especially rare.

"This plant is only found in this part of the world and nowhere else, so it's a unique part in our local and regional biodiversity."

Today's meeting will discuss land management concerns, such as activities or projects that might be affected within the designated areas. Wells says that the locations would only include federally-managed lands and will not affect private property.

The service will hold a comment period open until October 1st.

*Tuesday's public meeting is from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm at the Department of Interior Building, Great Basin Conference Room, 1340 Financial Boulevard, Reno, Nevada.