Anh Gray

Health Reporter

Anh Gray is a health reporter for the KUNR news team. She joined the station in 2014 as a producer. She has graduate degrees in public health from Boston University and in education degree from Teachers College, Columbia University.

 

In 2017, Anh received an award from the Associated Press Television Radio Association (APTRA) for best reporter. That year, Anh covered a variety of pressing public health issues like health care reform, the opioid epidemic and disease outbreaks. Other APTRA honors in the last several years include first place for spot news for her production of an anti-campus gun carry protest and second place for best public service reporting on her coverage of the opioid epidemic. Anh was also a contributing reporter for two series that won regional Edward R. Murrow awards: one on electric car maker, Tesla, and another on the impact of legalizing recreational marijuana in Nevada.

 

The International Center For Journalists-United Nations Foundation selected Anh in 2016 for a fellowship focusing on sustainable development issues. She attended the UN General Assembly and met with experts. As a result of this experience, Anh produced several stories covering access to health care for Syrian refugees in Northern Nevada, the lack of Native American doctors in the region and the rising concern of antimicrobial resistance.

 

Health policy, access to health care, and community health issues are Anh’s primary interests. She also enjoys covering innovations in the prevention of disease and the promotion of wellness. Those stories include nutrition, evidence-based health initiatives and medical breakthroughs.

 

Her home life is filled with the mayhem and laughter of three children, who also happen to be huge public radio fans. When not chasing after her next radio story, Anh enjoys spending time with her family hiking along the scenic trails around Lake Tahoe or taking off on weekned road trips.

 

 

A man sitting in front of a microphone in a radio station.
Anh Gray

The leading cause of death in Nevada is heart disease. Some medical facilities around the country, including Renown Health in Reno, are incorporating whole food, plant-based nutrition in their treatment plans. To learn more about the science behind this way of eating, KUNR's Anh Gray sat down with Dr. Michael Greger. He’s the author of the bestselling book How Not To Die and a leading expert on how nutrition can prevent premature death.

Pexels.com

The Food and Drug Administration is considering a plan that would curb the use of electronic-cigarettes among teenagers. As Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports, a group of Nevada researchers found that a significant amount of cancer-causing chemicals remain in the lungs from vaping.

bowl of fresh vegetables
Anna Pelzer via Unsplash

In the U.S., one person suffers a heart attack every 40 seconds. That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And as KUNR Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports Renown Health is offering a rehab program by helping patients incorporate a plant-based diet.

Fresh vegetables in baskets sit on a table.
Anh Gray

About half of the people living in Washoe County are rent burdened. That means they’re spending roughly a third of their income on housing. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray sits down with a public health expert to learn how Northern Nevada’s housing crunch is affecting people in the community.

Pallets with boxes of food sit in a food pantry.
Anh Gray

A new study from the Pew Charitable Trusts found that rents have been rising faster than incomes. Many families have a hard time paying for housing and buying food. Our reporter Anh Gray checks in with the head of the region’s food bank to see how housing security is linked to food security.

Anh Gray

People who are considered rent burdened spend roughly a third or more of their income on housing. This leaves many families with less for other essentials like food or healthcare. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports there’s a program that is helping low-income people battling illnesses get the nutrition they need.

High rent prices in Reno are placing many people in financially dire situations. With more of their income going to housing, families may have less to spend on essentials, like food. Our reporter Anh Gray visits a local food pantry to find out how the housing crunch is affecting people in the community.

A senior stands at a table with food in front of him.
Anh Gray

Older Americans are much more likely to experience the burden of high housing costs. Washoe County Senior Services provides a variety of programs, serving more than 20,000 people in the region. The lunch program is one of the most popular with many, including Bud Matlock. He lives in public housing and shares his story with KUNR.

Anh Gray

More than a third of Washoe County residents are 50 years or older. Across the country, the aging population is experiencing unprecedented growth. A recent report from the Harvard University Joint Center for Housing Studies found the nation is unprepared to meet the housing needs for seniors. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores how the lack of affordable housing in Northern Nevada is impacting low-income seniors in particular.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Washoe County Health District is confirming the first case of the measles in the region since 1999. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray has more.

Health Officials say that the infected person is a University of Nevada, Reno student, and that he does not pose an ongoing risk. Randall Todd is an epidemiologist with the health district.

Pages