Holly Hutchings

Reporter

Holly has always longed to be a news person, even if it took some time to get there. In her years as a stay-at-home mom to young children she scratched that itch by starting her own blogging business, where she wrote content for various businesses. She is thrilled to now be working as a reporter for KUNR. She enjoys public radio for its longform storytelling, unbiased search for truth and accessibility to all. She loves learning about people and helping share their stories. Holly joined KUNR in the summer of 2017 as a student reporter. After graduating from the Reynolds School of Journalism, she became KUNR's arts and culture reporter.   When not working at the station, Holly is usually driving her three sons to different activities, working on her personal podcast or trying out a new Reno restaurant with her husband. Her favorite thing to do is spend time with her family, riding bikes or hiking in the beautiful nearby mountains. 

Holly Hutchings

An exhibit paying homage to the 1960 Squaw Valley Winter Olympics is on display at the Truckee Community Recreation Center. Everything from vintage uniforms and rarely seen photography to illustrations by Walt Disney --a huge fan of skiing--are also showcased. The memorabilia are some of the last remaining vestiges of a games that changed winter sports and the Tahoe-Truckee region. Our arts reporter Holly Hutchings visited the exhibit and talked with one avid Olympic collector and author to learn more.

Holly Hutchings

Burning Man may be held in the Nevada desert, but its interest and appeal has a much wider reach. Visitors come from all over the world to attend the week-long festival, and even more people who don't attend have their curiosity piqued by tales from the playa. Trevor Hughes, Reporter for USA Today, has captured stories there for three years and stopped by our studio to talk to our arts reporter, Holly Hutchings before he headed up for burn number four.

Holly Hutchings

Michael Mikel is a co-founder of Burning Man, the international anti-establishment festival in the desert, and has been involved since 1988. He still attends and has a small camp on the outskirts of the playa, where he says it feels more like the Burning Man of the early days; fewer people and a clear view of the expansive desert canvas. Ideas of the festival’s future come more freely to him there. He says they’ve developed systems that allow the organization to change and live on long after he and the other originators are gone. Our reporter Holly Hutchings sat down with Mikel to talk Burning Man.

By BLM Nevada (Burning Man 2015) via Wikimedia Commons

Since its inception, the counterculture festival known as Burning Man has been a utopia for art and artists. Massive installations color the Black Rock Desert, even down to the very foundation on which the iconic “Man” stands. Our reporter Holly Hutchings caught up with the designer of the base to see what it’s all about.

Holly Hutchings

Sculpture artist Peter Hazel is heading to Burning Man for his sixth time this year. And, he hopes the massive jellyfish creation he’s crafted for the dusty artistic showcase will catapult his craft to new levels. Our reporter Holly Hutchings caught up with Hazel where he works at Artech, a shared workspace in Reno. 

A photo at night of a lit-up sign reading "Dragon Lights Festival" with brightly colored, lit-up fish and flowers surrounding it.
Alli Warner

Through the first week of August, Wilbur D. May Arboretum in Reno will be illuminated by nearly forty larger-than-life Chinese lanterns. The touring festival Dragon Lights displays crafted designs in an effort to share their centuries-old tradition and their culture. Our reporter Holly Hutchings checked it out.

Holly Hutchings

Dickerson Road is a one-mile, dead end street in an industrial area of Reno. It has a gritty history, including crime, motorcycle clubs and even a hippie commune at one point. Now, it’s experiencing a revitalization and becoming a haven for artists.

A man stands at a podium under a large white tent raising his hat and bowing his head with a group of people behind him also bowing their heads
Holly Hutchings

The Stewart Indian School in Carson City opened in 1890. Like similar schools across the country, the original goal was to assimilate Native American children and eliminate their culture and traditions. It closed its doors 90 years later in 1980. On Wednesday, alumni, tribal leaders and government officials gathered for a blessing ceremony for the future Stewart Indian School Cultural Center and Museum, which will open next year. Our reporter Holly Hutchings has the story.

Holly Hutchings

The Reno Rodeo is now in its 99th year. On top of the organization's ten-day annual event, the group also aims to pass down skills and Western culture to the next generation. This year, they partnered with Artown to hold their first-ever kids' rodeo and storytelling event. Our reporter Holly Hutchings was there.

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