Noah Glick

News Reporter

Noah Glick is from the small town of Auburn, Indiana and comes to KUNR from the Bay Area, where he spent his post-college years learning to ride his bike up huge hills. He’s always had a love for radio, but his true passion for public radio began when he discovered KQED in San Francisco. Along with a drive to discover the truth and a degree in Journalism from Ball State University, he hopes to bring a fresh perspective to local news coverage.

When he’s not doing radio-related stuff, he’s probably doing crosswords, drinking coffee, playing guitar—or trying to do all three at once. He lives in Sparks with his brother, sister-in-law, two nephews and four animals.

Alexa Ard

A University of Nevada, Reno student made headlines this weekend after a photo showing him at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia circulated nationwide.

The 20-year-old's participation sparked outrage among many fellow students and community members, who are calling for his expulsion. But UNR President Marc Johnson said Monday the school does not have a legal reason to do so.

Nevada Seismological Laboratory / University of Nevada, Reno

Humans account for an overwhelming majority of wildland fires, with federal agencies estimating that 80 to 90 percent are caused by people.

Target shooting is just one of several ways that people can spark flames. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick look at other actions worrying local officials, and finds out what happens to those caught starting fires.

Noah Glick

While heat and thunderstorms bring heightened potential for wildfires, the majority of wildfires are human-caused.

Target shooting in particular has been the cause of several blazes this year, including the Detweiler Fire that has destroyed more than 130 structures in Mariposa County, California.

Noah Glick

After two years of discussions, debates and drafts, the city of Reno is close to finalizing a new 20-year master plan. But what does that mean for the city and its residents?

Yama Rongomas

Nevada’s non-profit arts and culture organizations accounted for more than $471 million in economic activity, and 10,000 full-time jobs in 2015.

Noah Glick

Recreational marijuana sales officially kicked off July 1 in Nevada. But what exactly does a retail cannabis brand look like?

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick explores that question.

Michelle Matus

A district court judge in Carson City has granted a preliminary injunction that prohibits the state of Nevada from issuing distribution licenses for recreational pot to anyone other than wholesale alcohol distributors.

The ruling could impact the start date for retail cannabis sales, which were set to begin on July first.

Noah Glick

Tuesday, 5:04 p.m. update:

A district court judge in Carson City has granted a preliminary injunction that prohibits the state of Nevada from issuing distribution licenses for recreational pot to anyone other than wholesale alcohol distributors.

Noah Glick

The cannabis industry is projected to surge dramatically with the legalization of recreational pot in several states, including Nevada. But it’s not just the dispensaries who stand to benefit.

Michelle Matus

Production and cultivation of marijuana are ramping up in Nevada, but development on a commercial scale comes with certain air quality challenges.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah visited a specialized greenhouse to learn more about the potential environmental impact of the cannabis industry.

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