Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Democratic Gubernatorial Candidate Steve Sisolak talks with a farmer in rural Nevada.
Paul Boger

The race for Nevada's next governor has drawn a lot of attention. Not only will the election determine who will lead the state for the next four years, but it may also help decide key down-ballot races as well. KUNR's Paul Boger caught up with Democratic nominee for governor Steve Sisolak at a recent campaign event in Northern Nevada to see how the campaign is going and where the candidate stands on certain issues.

Non-partisan gubernatorial candidate Ryan Bundy has made a name for himself across the American West for his anti-establishment views and helping to lead armed standoffs against the federal government over land-use issues. While many see him as a controversial figure, others see him as a hero who may be well-suited to lead the state for the next four years. 

The 2018 Midterms are just 30 days away, and office-seekers in Nevada are crisscrossing the state working to drum up support ahead of the November election.

KUNR's Paul Boger sat down with Professor Lokken and has this report. 

Joe Ravi - CC-BY-SA 3.0

Nevada’s U.S. Senators are sharing opposing opinions on the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Nico Colombant / Our Town Reno

Shawna Roseman was kicked out of her home when she was 17 while going to McQueen high school and ended up living a half dozen years on the streets, sleeping under bridges in downtown Reno, battling drug addiction and constantly running away from cops, before someone outside her family decided to take her in and help her out.

She told her story to Our Town Reno by the Truckee river where she used to sleep.

Paul Boger / Reno Public Radio

Conservatives from across the state and country descended on Northern Nevada this weekend to participate in attorney general and gubernatorial candidate Adam Laxalt’s 4th annual Basque Fry. The event has become a proverbial who’s who for Nevada Republicans, serving as a way to both rally the base and raise some much-needed cash ahead of the election. 

Paul Boger

2017 was the hottest year on record for most of Northern Nevada. And while the warmer weather has created complications across the region, nowhere may be as impacted as Lake Tahoe. The delicate ecosystem of the continent’s largest alpine lake has been under assault for decades from invasive species, algae growth and decreasing clarity. But area leaders are now concerned that wildfires may pose an even greater threat to the lake.

Paul Laxalt, the conservative Republican who rose to political power becoming Nevada's 22nd Governor and later a U.S. Senator, has died.

Google Maps (June 2017)

There are more than 100 motels in Reno alone. For some, they’re links to the city’s unique past as a gaming mecca. Others see them as hotbeds of criminal activity that bring down the surrounding area’s economic potential. But as Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports, the motels are increasingly becoming a key player in Northern Nevada’s housing crunch.

Image of apartment complex behind chainlink fence and construction sign.
Paul Boger

Nearly a third of the households in the Truckee Meadows are considered either very low or extremely low income. That’s according to a report created by the Truckee Meadows Regional Planning Agency in 2016. With housing prices continuing to climb, many of those residents are being pushed out of the area. Part of the problem is the lack of publicly subsidized, affordable housing. Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger reports.

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