Burning Man

 Steve Benjamin mayor of Columbia, South Carolina speaks about his investments during his presidency with the U.S Confernece of Mayors .
Stephanie Serrano

A group of mayors from across the country are looking to Reno as an example of how arts and culture can power local economies. KUNR's Stephanie Serrano has more.

Holly Hutchings

Burning Man may be held in the Nevada desert, but its interest and appeal has a much wider reach. Visitors come from all over the world to attend the week-long festival, and even more people who don't attend have their curiosity piqued by tales from the playa. Trevor Hughes, Reporter for USA Today, has captured stories there for three years and stopped by our studio to talk to our arts reporter, Holly Hutchings before he headed up for burn number four.

Holly Hutchings

Michael Mikel is a co-founder of Burning Man, the international anti-establishment festival in the desert, and has been involved since 1988. He still attends and has a small camp on the outskirts of the playa, where he says it feels more like the Burning Man of the early days; fewer people and a clear view of the expansive desert canvas. Ideas of the festival’s future come more freely to him there. He says they’ve developed systems that allow the organization to change and live on long after he and the other originators are gone. Our reporter Holly Hutchings sat down with Mikel to talk Burning Man.

By BLM Nevada (Burning Man 2015) via Wikimedia Commons

Since its inception, the counterculture festival known as Burning Man has been a utopia for art and artists. Massive installations color the Black Rock Desert, even down to the very foundation on which the iconic “Man” stands. Our reporter Holly Hutchings caught up with the designer of the base to see what it’s all about.

Holly Hutchings

Sculpture artist Peter Hazel is heading to Burning Man for his sixth time this year. And, he hopes the massive jellyfish creation he’s crafted for the dusty artistic showcase will catapult his craft to new levels. Our reporter Holly Hutchings caught up with Hazel where he works at Artech, a shared workspace in Reno. 

Reno's Mini Playa

Jul 26, 2018
A smiling man wearing a black cut-off shirt sitting comfortably in a dimly lit roo. A lamp is on behind him and poofy skirts hang from the wall.
Taylor Burner

For a select few, Burning Man doesn’t end after the burning of the wooden effigy. At the Morris Burner Hostel in Reno, people live the Burning Man lifestyle 365 days a year. The hostel hosts up to 18 full-time residents in art-themed rooms. Students at the Reynolds School of Journalism profiled one those tenants, a formerly homeless man who is now employed as a carpenter for Burning Man’s most iconic artwork, the Man.

KUNR Goes to Fly Geyser

May 2, 2018
image of fly geyser
Joey Lovato

The infamous Fly Geyser, situated on the private land north of Gerlach, has been closed to the public for nearly two decades. But now, the land's new owners – the Burning Man Project – are opening the geyser for public viewing. Reporters Joey Lovato and Bree Zender got a rare chance to check out the Geyser. Take a virtual road trip to see the landmark that has been popular for nature photographers but rarely seen by the public.

image of fly geyser
Joey Lovato

The infamous Fly Geyser, situated on private land north of Gerlach, has been closed to the public for nearly two decades. But now, the land's new owners – the Burning Man Project – are opening the geyser for public viewing. Reno Public Radio's Bree Zender took a trip southwest of the Black Rock Desert, to find out more about it. 

Paul Boger

Over the past several years, Burning Man as an event has faced criticism. Some believe that the festival has moved too far beyond its roots as a place for artists to display their work.  Or where members of the “counterculture” can find support. They argue that it’s become too corporate, a playground for the rich. Others, though, feel like the event is moving in a more sustainable direction.

Paul Boger

The art that's out on the playa in Black Rock City is an integral part of Burning Man. This year, artists from around the world have constructed pieces that run the gamut from large to small, including wood structures, paintings, and more. Our reporter Paul Boger spoke with Anabel Romero from Los Angeles who is part of a crew that has created a large wooden structure called Aluna as well as Harvey Branscomb of Colorado, who helped bring a piece called the Mammoth Art Car to Nevada.

Pages