healthcare

Taking Calls, Saving Lives

Jul 24, 2018
A portrait of a smiling man wearing a black shirt with a name tag and red cross on his chest.
Illustration: Sylvia Li / Next Generation Radio

If you experience a medical emergency in the middle of the night, Owen Shaw may be one of the people who comes to help. Shaw is a paramedic for the Regional Emergency Medical Services Authority, or REMSA, which serves Washoe County. Students at the Reynolds School of Journalism went out with Shaw one night as he responded to calls. Here’s his story:

Alexa Ard

Nevada has a shortage of healthcare workers. To combat this problem, the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine is starting a physician assistant studies program.

 

The National Council

Updated at 7:00 p.m.  

The House passed a short-term funding bill Thursday evening, which included a six-year extension for the Children's Health Insurance Program. The legislation is headed to the Senate for a vote on Friday. It's unclear if Republicans have the 60 votes needed for the continuing resolution, which would avert a government shutdown.  

Updated at 11:00 a.m.

The National Council

Updated on December 1, 2017:

Governor Brian Sandoval’s office issued a press release announcing that the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services will be receiving about $5.6 million from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS. The money will help to keep the state’s Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, afloat for a short time while Congress considers passing a bill to reauthorize funding for the program. Without it, Nevada’s CHIP program would have run out of money by December 15th.

For the first time in Northern Nevada, thousands of employees at three Reno casinos have access to an onsite clinic. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray checks out what this type of healthcare looks like.

NPR

The most recent effort by GOP leaders to partially repeal the Affordable Care Act failed to pass this week. For that vote, Republican Senator Dean Heller stuck with his party by supporting the ‘skinny repeal.’ Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores the possible impact of this vote on his political future.

In a dramatic upset, Arizona Senator John McCain and two other Republicans voted no on the skinny repeal.

Reporter Michelle Rindels is with The Nevada Independent. She says Senator Dean Heller won’t have to take heat for sticking with the majority of his party.

A vote on health care legislation is expected Tuesday, but the details are murky. Political scientist Fred Lokken says it's unclear how Republican Senator Dean Heller will vote.

“He is now in the classical ‘damned if he does, damned if he doesn’t’ situation,” Lokken explains, “because if he does not support the state that becomes a huge issue. Frankly, it could play very heavily moving forward in his reelection campaign. If he does stand by his state, he could be targeted by the Trump PAC. A candidate could be put in the primary race to try to beat him for the nomination.”

Updated at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 2017:

Governor Brian Sandoval vetoed Assembly Bill 374.  In response to the veto, Assemblyman Mike Sprinkle, who sponsored the bill posted this statement on his Facebook page:

Nevada’s Second District Congressman, Republican Mark Amodei, has received criticism for his support for the controversial GOP-backed American Heath Care Act. Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger sat down with Congressman Amodei to talk about his support of the bill.

"It's not politically sexy," says Amodei. "I didn't make a deal to get my picture taken on Air Force One or get a free public lands bill. It's like, you've taken care of my issue I'll support it."

Noah Glick

After voting last week in favor of the new Republican-backed health care law, Nevada U.S. Congressman Mark Amodei is offering another option for Congress to consider: single-payer health care.

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