Reno history

A black and white photo of a man sitting at a desk turned to his left, shaking the hand of a man standing. Seven other people stand behind the two men shaking hands, all formally dressed.
Courtesy of Special Collections Department, University of Nevada, Reno

The federal Civil Rights Act passed in 1964, but for years before that, activists across the country were campaigning for equal rights in their own communities. Historian Alicia Barber takes us back to one important Reno campaign in this episode of “Time & Place.”

A dated postcard of the Sands Casino at night.
Steve Ellison

Today, some of Reno’s largest hotel casinos are located miles from the city center.  But they were once confined to a much smaller area, as Alicia Barber explains in this episode of “Time & Place.”

Unlike Las Vegas, Reno never had a strip, a part of town made up entirely of casinos. But it did have the “red line,” a virtual border that surrounded a four-block area just south of the railroad tracks. Only casinos inside the line could offer an unlimited number of slot machines and table games.

Jeff Auer is the director of the Nevada LGBTQ Archives. He's dedicated some time to preserving the history of LGBTQ people in Reno. Auer is going to be talking about his research in a public presentation on Sunday. Reno Public Radio's Bree Zender spoke with him about the stories he's preserving.

University of Nevada, Reno Special Collections.

These days, many look to electric cars and buses as the future of transportation. But using electricity to power vehicles isn’t entirely new. In fact, Reno was on the cutting edge of electric transit more than a century ago. Historian Alicia Barber explains in this segment of Time and Place.

 

Reno was infamous as the “divorce capital of the world” for much of the 20th century. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray sits down with a local historian Alicia Barber to learn more about how a new exhibit is preserving this unique part of Nevada’s history.