Green monopoly houses sit in a row against a stark, white background.
woodleywonderworks / Flickr Creative Commons

How Nevada's Eviction Moratorium Works

Like the rest of the country, Nevada is seeing a record-breaking spike in unemployment claims. In response, Governor Steve Sisolak placed a moratorium on evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. KUNR’s Paul Boger reached out to Rita Greggio, a lawyer with Washoe Legal Services, a nonprofit legal aid organization, to talk about what the governor’s directive means.

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An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Novel Coronavirus In Nevada: Live Blog

Reno-Tahoe International Airport Hobbled By COVID-19

Apr 4, 2020
An airport passenger drop-off terminal with no people and minimal cars.
Brian Bahouth / The Sierra Nevada Ally

Since the first of March, airline passenger volume in the United States has dropped by more than 80 percent. People are still allowed to fly, and freight terminals are busy, but the passenger numbers at the Reno-Tahoe International Airport are down to a trickle and the airport reaches deep into the regional economy.

A window that is cracking due to an impact.
Jason Jacobs / Flickr Creative Commons

Governor Steve Sisolak has directed Nevadans to stay at home to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, but for some people, their home is not a safe place. Multiple local nonprofits who help victims of domestic violence are seeing an increase in people reaching out for help that are experiencing violence at home. KUNR's Stephanie Serrano spoke with Karhla Ramirez-Tanori, the director of Crisis Intervention and Prevention at the Sierra Community House in Incline Village, to learn more.

Updated at 7:57 p.m. ET

Just days after the White House coronavirus task force warned Americans to brace for sobering death tolls, the administration is vowing to reimburse hospitals for treating uninsured patients infected with the coronavirus.

Un empleado de la destilería trabajando.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Read in English.

Tom Adams, dueño de la destilería Seven Troughs en Sparks, está creando alcohol de alta resistencia para usarlo en desinfectante para manos.

A distillery employee at work.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Lee en español.

Tom Adams, the owner of Seven Troughs Distillery in Sparks, is creating high proof alcohol for hand sanitizer.

An image of a saliva collection tube
Noah Glick

Researchers in the Mountain West are hoping to pioneer a new type of COVID-19 test that requires only a person’s saliva and can easily be done at home.

The Healthy Nevada Project is a community-based population health study, the largest of its kind in the world. Researchers behind the public-private partnership have collected DNA samples from the saliva of 50,000 Nevadans, with the goal of reaching a million samples statewide.

For the past two weeks, Nathan Tetreault of Lillian, Ala., has suffered through likely COVID-19 symptoms: dry cough, fever, waking up in the middle of the night struggling to breathe.

"I don't know if I have it. However, chances are pretty darn likely," Tetreault says.

Doctors wouldn't test him last week because he didn't meet the required criteria early on: He's not someone who's over 65 and showing symptoms, and he hasn't traveled outside the U.S. or come into contact with anyone he knows of who has tested positive.

Medical rationing is not something Americans are accustomed to, but COVID-19 may soon change that.

The specter of rationing is most imminent in New York City, where the virus is spreading rapidly and overwhelming hospitals with patients.

According to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, the state has 2,200 ventilators in its state stockpile. Current COVID-19 case projections suggest the state may not have enough of the machines, which help critically ill people breathe, as soon as next week.

Updated at 10:09 a.m. ET

For the first time in nearly a decade, the U.S. suffered a net loss of jobs as the coronavirus began to take hold in the country. But a monthly snapshot from the Labor Department shows only the first pinpricks of what will soon be a gaping wound.

Two N95-type face masks, or respirators, and one N100-type mask.
Debora Cartagena / CDC

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

At a press conference on Wednesday, Governor Steve Sisolak addressed some of the state’s most pressing health care capacity problems. The governor touched on the lack of personal protective equipment, or PPE, and he committed to slashing red tape to bolster the medical workforce.

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