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Up First briefing: Hamas releases 2 more hostages; posture and our mental health

A local citizen searches through buildings which were destroyed during Israeli air raids in the southern Gaza Strip on Monday in Khan Younis, Gaza.
Ahmad Hasaballah
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Getty Images
A local citizen searches through buildings which were destroyed during Israeli air raids in the southern Gaza Strip on Monday in Khan Younis, Gaza.

Good morning. You're reading the Up First newsletter. Subscribe here to get it delivered to your inbox, and listen to the Up First podcast for all the news you need to start your day.

Today's top stories

Hamas released yesterday two elderly women held hostage. Their husbands remain captive. The move follows last week's release of two Israeli Americans — a mother and daughter. More than 200 Israeli and foreign hostages remain in Gaza.

  • Israel's airstrikes are intensifying and the military is poised for a ground invasion, NPR's Susan Davis says on Up First. But Israel's allies are urging the country to go slow over concerns about its endgame in Gaza.
  • A dozen Palestinian Americans spoke with NPR about grieving and their fears of rising Islamophobia.


Check out npr.org/mideastupdates for more coverage, differing views and analysis of this conflict.

Another week, another House speaker nomination vote. Republican reps will try to nominate another speaker today after eight of their colleagues made their pitches last night.


The U.S. is experiencing a steep sell-off in the bond market, with major implications for the economy and personal pocketbooks. Here's how it could affect your credit card interest rates, mortgages and retirement savings.

  • "Historically, one of the worst sell-offs we have ever seen," is how an Oxford Economics analyst describes it to NPR's David Gura. The Fed has been struggling to slow the economy down and curb inflation.


Hollywood actors in the SAG-AFTRA union return to talks with major studios today. They've been on strike for more than 100 days.

  • Studios broke contact two weeks ago after the union asked them to pay actors 57 cents per subscriber, NPR's Mandalit del Barco says. The entertainment companies instead offered bonus residuals based on a film or show's success — similar to their deal with the Writers Guild of America.

  • Meanwhile, the United Auto Workers expanded their strike, hitting Chrysler maker Stellantis's largest plant. 

Body electric

/ Daniel Hertzberg
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Daniel Hertzberg

Body Electric is a six-part investigation and interactive project with TED Radio Hour host Manoush Zomorodi exploring the relationship between our technology and our bodies... and how we can improve it.

It's pretty common knowledge that slouching at your desk all day can cause back and neck pain. But what if it's also making you stressed and anxious? By studying the adrenal medulla — the inner part of an adrenal gland that triggers the body's fight-or-flight response — scientists understand better how movement impacts mental health.

Zomorodi speaks with neuroscientist Peter Strick about the three-way conversation between our brain, core muscles and adrenal glands in Episode 3 of Body Electric.

Life advice

Kaz Fantone/NPR
/ NPR
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NPR
Kaz Fantone/NPR

There are many reasons why you might choose to live with your parents as an adult, but one thing is true: The dynamics are very different than living with your parents as a child or teen. Social worker Stacey Younge has some advice for setting boundaries and building a harmonious household:

  • Be kind to yourself. Moving back in with your parents isn't a setback.
  • Create an exit plan that includes personal, professional and financial goals.
  • Don't stop living your life. Maintain a stable routine. This includes dating!
  • Contribute what you can to the household. 

3 things to know before you go

A Halloween reveler participates in New York City's 48th annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade, Sunday, Oct. 31, 2021, in New York.
Dieu-Nalio Chery / AP
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AP
A Halloween reveler participates in New York City's 48th annual Greenwich Village Halloween Parade, Sunday, Oct. 31, 2021, in New York.

  1. There may not be as many Barbies out this Halloween weekend as expected. The SAG-AFTRA actors union told members to avoid dressing up as characters from struck content. 
  2. An Alaska Airlines flight made a forced landing this past weekend after an off-duty pilot riding in the cockpit allegedly attempted to disable the plane's engines.
  3. At least seven people died after a "superfog" of smoke from south Louisiana marsh fires caused multiple car crashes. 

This newsletter was edited by Olivia Hampton.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.