Anh Gray | KUNR

Anh Gray

Public Health Editor

Anh is a public health editor for the KUNR news team and has been with the station since 2014. She is an alumna of the Boston University School of Public Health and Teachers College, Columbia University.

 

Anh is the recipient of the 2019 Minnotte Health Reporting Fellowship from the Radio Television Digital News Foundation. She is also a two time recipient of the Associated Press Television Radio Association (APTRA) best reporter honor for her work in 2017 and 2019. She also received the 2019 Regional Edward R. Murrow Award in hard news reporting for her story about healthcare disparities for the LGBTQ+ community. She has also covered a variety of pressing public health issues like health care reform, the opioid epidemic, and disease outbreaks including the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Other professional experiences include mentorship with NPR's Next Generation Radio and Report for America, participation in the 2018 National Press Foundation Innovations in Public Health Fellowship, and the 2016 International Center For Journalists-United Nations Foundation Fellowship. She has also served as a judge for the National Edward R. Murrow Awards. 

 

Her home life is filled with the mayhem and laughter of three children, who also happen to be huge public radio fans. When not chasing after her next radio story, Anh enjoys spending time with her family hiking along the scenic trails around Lake Tahoe or taking off on weekend road trips.

 

 

Man smiling on a crowded street
Courtesy of Ish Bermudez

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

In early March, Nevadan make-up artist Ish Bermudez was touring with the show Chippendales Las Vegas across the country as a wardrobe manager. He began not feeling well while he was still on the road traveling in New York, Ohio and Indiana. He sought care at an urgent care facility, where he was given some pain medication, but a COVID-19 test wasn’t available.

Female scientist producing viral transport media.
Dana Reed/ UNR Med

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

According to health officials, increasing COVID-19 testing capacity is one benchmark needed to gradually reopen Nevada. Early on in the pandemic, shortages of testing kits were an issue for Dr. Mark Pandori who runs the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory. That’s why he reached out to other scientists in the community to help fill the gaps. 

KUNR’s Anh Gray talked to one of them to learn if it’s possible to continue to ramp up production of testing materials.

Health care workers at a Washoe County Health District drive-through testing site.
Bree Zender

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

Editor's Note: This story aired before Washoe County Regional Information Center held a virtual press conference on April 24th. Washoe County Health District Kevin Dick provided new information about testing in the community. He says the state has requested the county to target 1,000 COVID-19 tests per day beginning Monday, April 27th. Dick says the county does not have the capacity to reach that target yet since there is currently still a shortage of testing supplies and equipment to process that amount. The district is currently working with the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory and other agencies to increase capacity, and will provide more information on the process next week. 

When will the state’s shutdown be lifted is on the minds of many Nevadans. Governor Steve Sisolak held a press conference earlier this week to update residents.

“Due to the criteria that was developed by the state team and in accordance with White House guidance,” Sisolak said, “as of right now, I can not give you a firm date as to whether we will meet all of this criteria to begin phase one reopening plans.”

As KUNR’s Anh Gray reports, those criteria include meeting health benchmarks, which will require more testing.

Two first responders standing in front of a REMSA ambulance.
Courtesy of REMSA

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

There are surges of COVID-19 patients at hospitals in some hotspots around the country, but overall, emergency room visits are actually down nationwide. However, some local medical providers are concerned that people are avoiding care due to fears of catching COVID-19.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

9:21 p.m. | April 28, 2020
By Danna O'Connor

Statewide Death Toll Is Now 225, Washoe Co. Death Toll Is 29

The exterior of the Willow Springs facility in Reno, Nevada.
Screenshot / Google Maps

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

There have been 15 COVID-19-related deaths in Washoe County so far. A third of those deaths are tied to two state-regulated facilities in Reno. KUNR News Director Michelle Billman checks in with Anh Gray, KUNR's public health reporter, for more information about those two outbreaks.

A medical student administers a COVID-19 swab test through the window of a car.
Brin Reynolds / University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

In mid-march, The American Association of Medical Colleges recommended that medical schools suspend clinical rotations because of the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Two N95-type face masks, or respirators, and one N100-type mask.
Debora Cartagena / CDC

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

Lakeside Health and Wellness Suites is a residential nursing care facility in Reno. The state is currently investigating 43 confirmed cases of COVID-19 there. Four residents have died.

A medical student performing a COVID-19 swab test through a car window. Another medical student is holding a bag to place the test in afterward.
Brin Reynolds / University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

The COVID-19 pandemic has moved the education of students at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine online. To help during the crisis, more than 70 of them are now volunteering throughout Northern Nevada.

The exterior of the Willow Springs facility in Reno, Nevada.
Screenshot / Google Maps

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

At a residential treatment facility in Reno, 24 youth and 11 staff have tested positive for COVID-19. One staff member has died. Willow Springs serves children and teens with behavioral and mental health needs. The Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health is currently investigating the outbreak.

Two N95-type face masks, or respirators, and one N100-type mask.
Debora Cartagena / CDC

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

At a press conference on Wednesday, Governor Steve Sisolak addressed some of the state’s most pressing health care capacity problems. The governor touched on the lack of personal protective equipment, or PPE, and he committed to slashing red tape to bolster the medical workforce.

An unoccupied clinic room in Elko with an exam bed, counter, seating and essential tools, including gloves, swabs and a sharps container.
Brin Reynolds / University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

As the novel coronavirus threatens health care capacity in Nevada, more doctors are turning to telehealth to stem the spread of infection. While virtual visits are recommended, there are challenges to this type of care, especially in rural communities.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Tuesday, April 7

9:07 p.m. | April 7, 2020 
By Danna O'Connor

Fifth COVID-19 Death Announced In Washoe Co.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Two N95-type face masks, or respirators, and one N100-type mask.
Debora Cartagena / CDC

The shortage of personal protective equipment used by health workers has been a nationwide problem during the novel coronavirus pandemic. Providers are grappling with the challenges presented to them and they're looking at various other ways to protect themselves and the community.

Exterior of the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory in Reno, Nevada.
University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine

COVID-19 testing shortages nationwide have been a significant issue. Nevada is now one of several states that have notified the Food and Drug Administration that it’s making modifications to the test in an effort to mitigate shortages statewide.

Dr. Mark Pandori heads the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory. He talked with KUNR’s Anh Gray to break down the process involved in the development of the modified test.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Thursday, March 26

9:19 p.m. | March 26, 2020
By Paul Boger

Nevada Cases Surpass 500

 

The number of COVID-19 cases in Nevada jumped by 115 on Thursday, bringing the statewide total to 535. That’s according to a late-night update of the state’s coronavirus dashboard. 

Los proveedores de salud en St. Mary's se paran juntos con carteles de papel que dicen, "quédense en casa, nos quedaremos en el trabajo por ustedes, gracias por quedarse en casa por nosotros, siempre abierto"
Anh Gray / KUNR

El gobernador Steve Sisolak anunció el cierre de escuelas, casinos y empresas no esenciales en todo el estado para frenar la propagación de coronavirus. La medida es para salvar vidas y evitar que el sistema de salud se inunde. Pero como informa Anh Gray de KUNR, la falta de recursos cruciales, incluyendo máscaras protectoras e incluso proveedores, ya está presionando al sistema.

Health care providers at St. Mary's stand together with paper signs that say, "stay at home, we'll stay at work for you, thank you for staying home for us, always open"
Anh Gray / KUNR

Governor Steve Sisolak announced the statewide closures of schools, casinos and non-essential businesses to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. The move is to save lives and to prevent the health care system from being inundated. However, the lack of crucial resources, including protective masks, tests and even providers, is already straining the system.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Pages