Bree Zender

Morning Edition Host and Reporter

Bree Zender is KUNR's award-winning Morning Edition host, news anchor, and reporter. You may have also heard her on NPR's All Things Considered, NPR's Here & Now, and KQED's The California Report.

Bree grew up in between a rural and urban divide. She often hopped between the urban centers of Western Washington like Seattle and Bellingham, and her rural logging hometown, Deming. She learned to love the complexities of these worlds—the beautiful and the ugly. Her appreciation of these rich life textures inspired Bree to become a journalist.

She started her radio career as an intern at Montana Public Radio in Missoula, after graduating from the University of Montana with degrees in theatre and journalism. From there, she moved to San Luis Obispo, California to serve as KCBX-Central Coast Public Radio’s midday host and reporter from 2016 to 2017.

Bree is currently pursuing her master’s degree at the University of Nevada, Reno, focusing on media innovation.

When she’s not on the radio, she is usually hiking or rock climbing. She lives in Reno with her cat, Pete.

Female surgeon looks down while other workers care for a patient behind her.
PickPik

The novel coronavirus pandemic has created shortages of medical supplies, especially personal protective equipment, across the nation. The crisis is also exacerbating health care capacity in Nevada.

While the shortage of providers had already been a problem before, it could hamper the state response to COVID-19, according to Dr. John Packham of the Office of Statewide Initiatives at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine. He said the shortages of medical staff spans a broad array of practices.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Nurse holds COVID-19 Sample Kit
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

If you’re starting to feel sick, what do you do? Sore throat, exhaustion, trouble breathing... No doubt at that point you’d have COVID-19 on your mind.

A microscopic picture of coronavirus
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases / Flickr/Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

The U.S. Senate is negotiating how a House novel coronavirus relief package will be distributed to the public. KUNR's Bree Zender spoke with Nevada's 2nd District Congressman Mark Amodei about this pending legislation and what economic hurdles Nevada is now facing due to the pandemic.

A microscopic picture of coronavirus
NIAID / Flickr/Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

As many Nevadans face hardships ahead due to restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of the novel coronavirus, some are looking to the government for relief. Nevada U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto has been involved in some of the decision-making regarding these federal relief packages. She spoke Friday with KUNR's Bree Zender.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Woman types on computer.
Evolution Labs / Flickr/Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

In response to the spread of coronavirus, schools across the nation, including the University of Nevada, Reno, are transitioning to online learning for a period of time. This adjustment can be a challenge for some students; particularly those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Man in protective gear shows medical equipment
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Some people who have flu-like symptoms may not be sure if they should get tested for COVID-19. The Washoe County Health District has a set of criteria for who should be tested. The criteria the district sets is based on recommendations from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

For recent updates on Coronavirus in Nevada, visit our updates and resources webpage.

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Wednesday, March 18

10:17 p.m. PDT | March 18, 2020
By Michelle Billman

State Total Of COVID-19 Cases Hits 85

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

For recent updates on Coronavirus in Nevada, visit our updates and resources webpage.

Southern Nevada Health District Announces Three New Positive Cases Of COVID-19
A Total Of Five Presumptive Positive Cases Reported In Clark County

A microscopic picture of COVID-19
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases / Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

An official from the Washoe County Health District said the county doesn’t have adequate staffing to respond to a possible outbreak of coronavirus, or COVID-19.

Man speaks to crowd of enthusiastic young people
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

Bernie Sanders was the 'belle of the ball' Saturday night, or rather, the 'belle of Nevada.' He easily took first place in the state's caucuses.

A desert landscape with a road heading toward the horizon
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Though Nevada has a fair amount of cities, vast parts of the state are a sea of sagebrush, with very few towns. And as the Nevada State Democratic Party gears up for its caucuses on Saturday, Democrats in the state’s many rural counties are facing significant hurdles with the caucus system. 

A picture of Pete Buttigieg shaking hands with voters.
Noah Glick

Early voting is underway for Nevada's caucus, and candidates are making their way to Northern Nevada to stump. In the past week alone, our area has seen campaign visits from all, with the exception of former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg and U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard from Hawaii.

Trei Brundrett / Flickr/Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)/Edited

After the chaos of the Iowa caucuses, Democrats in the next caucus state of Nevada are anxious.

Three kids playing on a swing set.
Raul Lieberwirth / Flickr, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Those who are ordered to pay child support in Nevada now have more of a range as to how much they pay under an evaluation from a judge. The changes, that went into effect this month, are meant to give judges more latitude to determine how much a parent is able to pay.

A gondola moves up the mountain
Steve Jurvetson / Flickr, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Two Tahoe-area ski resorts can move forward with their plans to build a massive gondola connecting the properties together.

Four AFSCME union members stand as one reads a statement.
Daniel Clark / The Nevada Independent

Ahead of the Nevada Democratic caucus, speculation over which candidate union members are going to stand behind is mounting. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, union members make up nearly 15 percent of the state’s workforce.

Person holds an Iowa presidential preference card.
Phil Roeder / Flickr / Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Iowa democrats were thrown for a loop in their caucus reporting on Monday, due to coding errors on their app.

Caucus participants in Ankeny, Iowa.
Clay Masters / Iowa Public Radio

Results for the Iowa Democratic caucus have yet to be released, due to complications with the newly developed precinct reporting app that was used. Coding issues and minimal training led to widespread confusion across the state.

The Nevada State Democratic Party is planning to use a similar app-based system for its Feb. 22 caucus. Looking ahead, third-in-line Nevada caucus participants are raising red flags — especially in light of the new app being used for the first time in the state.

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