Lucia Starbuck

Report for America Corps Member

Lucia Starbuck is a corps member with Report for America focusing on community reporting and the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. She is from Reno and graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno with a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a minor in cinema and media studies. Local community issues are her passion, including the affordable housing crisis, homelessness, a lack of access to healthcare, protests and challenges facing vulnerable communities in northern Nevada.

Lucia contributed to KUNR’s coverage of hateful expressions, including anti-Semitism, at the University of Nevada, Reno, produced in 2019, which won a regional Edward R. Murrow award in the Best Continuing Coverage category and first place in the Associated Press Television and Radio Association (APTRA) broadcast contest for Continuing Coverage. She co-created and contributed to a series about the Reno Rodeo’s 100th anniversary called Spurs & Mud: A Century of Rodeo, which won first place from APTRA in 2019 for Best Sports Coverage. In 2020, she was awarded the Robert Laxalt Distinguished Writer Award from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

A man in a red shirt and cowboy hat is grabbing surgical bandages.
Holly Hutchings

The Reno Rodeo has ended, and some of the athletes are already headed to their next competitions. Injuries from these events can leave riders with lasting impacts, physically and emotionally, as they move forward. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck has more.

Reno Rodeo 100: Living Near The Horses

Jun 28, 2019
Man smiles in front of camera. He is wearing a cowboy hat.
Jessi LeMay

The Reno Rodeo 100 is a multimedia storytelling series wherein people connected to the event have shared intimate, up close tales from the rodeo during open mic events and as part of more in-depth interviews with rodeo documentarians. In this excerpt, Bill Richards describes what it was like living in a tack room. He also reflects on how he was mesmerized by the first Reno Rodeo that he attended in 1947.

A boy in a cowboy hat looks at sheep.
Lucia Starbuck

Mutton bustin’ is one of the Reno Rodeo’s most popular events. It involves children clinging onto the backs of sheep and trying to hang on, as long as possible. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck explores what this sport means to those involved.

Man looks away from camera. He has a cowboy hat on.
Jessi LeMay

The Reno Rodeo 100 is a multimedia storytelling series commemorating the event’s 100th anniversary. In this excerpt, Brett Scheerer from Businessman’s Steer Decorating, remembers a time when a poor soul lost his pants...at the Reno Rodeo. He shared the comical tale at an open mic night.

A woman is on a horse. A dog is next to her.
Lucia Starbuck

While the Reno Rodeo is just in town this month, local athletes are practicing year-round. And as KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck reports, even though women have been competing in rodeos close to 70 years, their opportunities to compete remain limited. 

A woman holds a camera.
Lucia Starbuck

To celebrate and capture the history of the Reno Rodeo's 100th anniversary, multimedia storyteller Jessi LeMay has interviewed more than 75 individuals about their memories of this Western event. She’s talked to cowboys, competitors, queens and everyone in between for the project she's created, Reno Rodeo 100. She spoke with KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck about the project.

Toothbrushes and toothpaste in a purple bin.
Lucia Starbuck

Medicare is the federal health insurance program mostly known for serving adults over the age of 65 regardless of income. Nearly half a million Nevadans are enrolled, but they must still pay out of pocket for dentures or routine dental procedures like cleanings, fillings and tooth extractions. As a result, some seniors must forgo dental care or seek out low cost clinics. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck has more.

Dental care equipment on a tray
Lucia Starbuck

Lawmakers have introduced a bill to allow mid-level dental providers, called dental therapists, to practice in Nevada. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck explores why this bill has caused heated debate within the dental community.

A tray of dental equipment.
Lucia Starbuck

People with diabetes are more at risk for gum disease and infections. Medicaid doesn’t cover routine dental procedures. That’s why there’s a bill to expand dental coverage for Nevadans with diabetes. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck has more.

A man stands in front of a very large mound of snow.
Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows

The Tahoe region is reporting staggering snowfall totals for the month of February. Truckee received 121 inches while Tahoe City came in at 134 inches. 

Hands hold a series of giftcards.
Lucia Starbuck

The government is temporarily open following the longest shutdown in U.S. history lasting 35 days. In Nevada, nearly 3,500 federal employees continue to be impacted. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck spoke to several of them as they started returning to work this week unsure of when their back pay will arrive.

A row of canned food on a shelf.
Lucia Starbuck.

Due to rising rents and tuition costs, there is an increasing need for easier access to affordable food and other daily necessities for students at the University of Nevada, Reno. Student contributor Lucia Starbuck explores a resource on campus called Pack Provisions that provided food or clothing to more than 600 visitors during the fall semester.

 

Lucia Starbuck / Reynolds Sandbox

Statistics show 18 to 29-year-olds in the U.S. are the least likely to vote in an election. That’s according to the United States Election Project, a group the gathers information about the nation’s electoral system. In an effort to reverse that trend, students at the University of Nevada, Reno are actively working to encourage their classmates to vote during Nevada’s 2018 midterm elections. As contributor Lucia Starbuck explains, student volunteers say there is no excuse for other students not to vote.

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