Noah Glick

Nevada Reporter

Growing up in Indiana, Noah Glick is a Westerner at heart. As a reporter in Reno, Nevada, he covers issues affecting the Mountain West, including climate change, economics, water rights, energy and culture.

Outside of work, you might catch him outside hiking, camping or playing inline hockey.

Michelle Matus / KUNR

Bipartisan legislation making its way through Congress would give legal cannabis companies access to the federal banking system. This week a majority of attorneys general from around the U.S. signed a letter supporting the so-called SAFE Banking Act, including in Colorado, Utah, Nevada and New Mexico.

 

Healthy Nevada Project

Nevadans are taking part in a groundbreaking genetic study that could give researchers insights into public health across the state.

Nearly 50,000 Nevadans have already taken part in the Healthy Nevada Project. Now the study is expanding statewide, making it one of the largest of its kind in the world. Participants donate saliva in exchange for their DNA information. Joseph Grzymski is the principal investigator for the project.

Tim Trad / Unsplash

In a mostly symbolic move, the U.S. House voted Thursday to stop the Trump administration from exiting the Paris Climate Agreement. Meanwhile, many cities and states in the Mountain West are continuing to warm faster than the national average.

 

Image of Jake Shimabukuro performing on-stage
Artown / Jake Shimabukuro

Artown is underway in Reno, and along with some big names, this year’s month-long celebration of the arts also includes a master of a small instrument: the ukulele.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick caught up with ukulele musician Jake Shimabukuro over the phone during his current tour.

Construction workers on site of an apartment complex being constructed for people 55 years of age and older.
Noah Glick

For our series, Priced Out: The Housing Crunch, our reporters have been speaking to several developers. And some have pointed out one potential reason for rising housing costs: immigration enforcement.

Noah Glick

During our series, "Priced Out: The Housing Crunch," we've looked at the ways rising housing costs have affected various groups within the community, and we've delved into options moving forward.

Now, we're going to look at something a little different.

Noah Glick

With housing costs reaching record highs throughout northern Nevada, potential buyers and builders are looking at alternative options.

One big idea that’s gaining traction nationwide is small: tiny homes.

image of large residential building being constructed
Noah Glick

The housing supply in Northern Nevada is far below demand, which has led to a rapid rise in costs.

Many are calling for more development, but builders in the community say they’re unable to keep up.

The median sales price of a single-family home in Reno is now higher than it was during the peak of the housing boom just before the Great Recession.

This surge in pricing is reminding many in the region of the thriving market of the mid-2000s, as well as the devastation the ensuing crash caused to Northern Nevada.

Outside of major metropolitan areas like the Bay Area and Seattle, Reno has one of the highest median home prices in the American West.

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