Noah Glick

Nevada Reporter

Growing up in Indiana, Noah Glick is a Westerner at heart. As a reporter in Reno, Nevada, he covers issues affecting the Mountain West, including climate change, economics, water rights, energy and culture.

Outside of work, you might catch him outside hiking, camping or playing inline hockey.

Bureau of Land Management

The Department of the Interior is continuing its push to move some agency headquarters out West by asking Congress to fund the initiative.

Interior Secretary David Bernhardt is asking Congress for $10.5 million in the next fiscal year for the relocation efforts. The department says it plans to choose a new western location for the Bureau of Land Management headquarters later this year. It has also signaled that it may move the U.S. Geological Survey headquarters to the Denver area.

Michelle Matus / KUNR

Bipartisan legislation making its way through Congress would give legal cannabis companies access to the federal banking system. This week a majority of attorneys general from around the U.S. signed a letter supporting the so-called SAFE Banking Act, including in Colorado, Utah, Nevada and New Mexico.

 

Healthy Nevada Project

Nevadans are taking part in a groundbreaking genetic study that could give researchers insights into public health across the state.

Nearly 50,000 Nevadans have already taken part in the Healthy Nevada Project. Now the study is expanding statewide, making it one of the largest of its kind in the world. Participants donate saliva in exchange for their DNA information. Joseph Grzymski is the principal investigator for the project.

Tim Trad / Unsplash

In a mostly symbolic move, the U.S. House voted Thursday to stop the Trump administration from exiting the Paris Climate Agreement. Meanwhile, many cities and states in the Mountain West are continuing to warm faster than the national average.

 

Image of Jake Shimabukuro performing on-stage
Artown / Jake Shimabukuro

Artown is underway in Reno, and along with some big names, this year’s month-long celebration of the arts also includes a master of a small instrument: the ukulele.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick caught up with ukulele musician Jake Shimabukuro over the phone during his current tour.

Construction workers on site of an apartment complex being constructed for people 55 years of age and older.
Noah Glick

For our series, Priced Out: The Housing Crunch, our reporters have been speaking to several developers. And some have pointed out one potential reason for rising housing costs: immigration enforcement.

Noah Glick

During our series, "Priced Out: The Housing Crunch," we've looked at the ways rising housing costs have affected various groups within the community, and we've delved into options moving forward.

Now, we're going to look at something a little different.

Noah Glick

With housing costs reaching record highs throughout northern Nevada, potential buyers and builders are looking at alternative options.

One big idea that’s gaining traction nationwide is small: tiny homes.

image of large residential building being constructed
Noah Glick

The housing supply in Northern Nevada is far below demand, which has led to a rapid rise in costs.

Many are calling for more development, but builders in the community say they’re unable to keep up.

The median sales price of a single-family home in Reno is now higher than it was during the peak of the housing boom just before the Great Recession.

This surge in pricing is reminding many in the region of the thriving market of the mid-2000s, as well as the devastation the ensuing crash caused to Northern Nevada.

Outside of major metropolitan areas like the Bay Area and Seattle, Reno has one of the highest median home prices in the American West.

During the Great Recession, unemployment in Nevada reached 14.5 percent. That led the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada, or EDAWN, to try and attract high numbers of jobs to the region.

Now, with low unemployment and rapid growth, local leaders are setting their sights on higher paying tech jobs.

Noah Glick

A new state park is coming to Northern Nevada, opening 12,000 acres and 28 miles of property along the East Walker River.

Reno Public Radio's Noah Glick took a trip to the new Walker River State Recreation Area, which offers access to an area that's been closed to the public for more than 100 years.

"So, this will be a slight path to the group area from here," says Randy Denter, park supervisor for Nevada State Parks. "Right now, it's just a bunch of weeds. So right now, we're just in a big weed field, some tumbleweeds and mustard."

Julia Ritchey

Since the Great Recession, Nevada has made significant investments in diversifying its economy into a new frontier: technology.

Apple, Tesla and Switch have all set up here. So, what does the future look like for this growing industry in northern Nevada?

Noah Glick

The tech industry continues to grow at a rapid pace in northern Nevada, with more companies continuing to move to the region. But what do these jobs actually look like? And what kind of wages can workers expect?

Michelle Matus

Northern Nevada has garnered national attention as a major technology hub, particularly since Tesla began building its Gigafactory.

But is that characterization accurate? 

Alexa Ard

Last November, Nevada voters approved Question 1, an initiative that requires all private firearm sales and transfers to undergo background checks, including those at gun shows.

But a video taken less than a week after the Las Vegas massacre shows gun sellers at a Reno gun show selling firearms without the required background checks.

Gino Borges is a partner and Director of Impact at OpenPath Investments, a social impact real estate company based in Truckee, Cali.
OpenPath Investments

With housing in high demand throughout northern Nevada and eastern California, several property managers are charging higher rents to potential tenants.

But some companies are trying something different to increase value.

Governor Sandoval / Twitter

As Nevada's gubernatorial race begins to heat up, current Republican Governor Brian Sandoval says he hopes one key piece of his legacy remains intact for the next administration.

Noah Glick

More than 150 people met in Incline Village Monday to discuss the economic challenges facing the Tahoe Basin.

As Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports, much of the attention was on housing.

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