Noah Glick

Nevada Reporter

Growing up in Indiana, Noah Glick is a Westerner at heart. As a reporter in Reno, Nevada, he covers issues affecting the Mountain West, including climate change, economics, water rights, energy and culture.

Outside of work, you might catch him outside hiking, camping or playing inline hockey.

A look at some of the paintings done by people with disabilities at High Sierra Industries' iChoose program
Jennie Stokes / High Sierra Industries

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 20 percent of Americans live with a disability.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick introduces us to Jennie Stokes, an activities specialist at High Sierra Industries in Reno. Stokes helps people with special needs get out into the community.

Noah Glick

More than one in five adults in Nevada live with a disability. Yet, most of them looking for work are unable to find a job.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick explores the barriers to employment for people with special needs and what’s being done to help.

Noah Glick

The University of Nevada, Reno community came together Wednesday to address the actions taken by a UNR student during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia earlier this month.

But many faculty and students are frustrated at what they say is a lack of action by the school’s administration to fight racism and bigotry on campus.

Noah Glick

The annual Lake Tahoe Summit brings together elected representatives from Nevada and California to discuss the future of the basin.

This year, officials focused on the impact of climate change and urban development on its famed clarity.

Ken Lund / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Anaconda Copper Mine near Yerington, which has been out of operation since the late 1990s, may soon have a new cleanup strategy.

The state of Nevada is hoping to take the lead on restoring the site, and has formally requested that the EPA hold off on adding it to its national priority list.

University of Nevada, Reno

A solar eclipse is set to sweep across much of the U.S. Monday morning. And while northern Nevada is not in the direct path, residents here will get a rare glimpse as the moon passes in front of the sun.

One University of Nevada, Reno professor is headed up to Oregon to not only take in the eclipse, but also to hopefully bring back some new findings about the cosmos.

Alexa Ard

A University of Nevada, Reno student made headlines this weekend after a photo showing him at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia circulated nationwide.

The 20-year-old's participation sparked outrage among many fellow students and community members, who are calling for his expulsion. But UNR President Marc Johnson said Monday the school does not have a legal reason to do so.

Nevada Seismological Laboratory / University of Nevada, Reno

Humans account for an overwhelming majority of wildland fires, with federal agencies estimating that 80 to 90 percent are caused by people.

Target shooting is just one of several ways that people can spark flames. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick look at other actions worrying local officials, and finds out what happens to those caught starting fires.

Noah Glick

While heat and thunderstorms bring heightened potential for wildfires, the majority of wildfires are human-caused.

Target shooting in particular has been the cause of several blazes this year, including the Detweiler Fire that has destroyed more than 130 structures in Mariposa County, California.

Noah Glick

After two years of discussions, debates and drafts, the city of Reno is close to finalizing a new 20-year master plan. But what does that mean for the city and its residents?

Yama Rongomas

Nevada’s non-profit arts and culture organizations accounted for more than $471 million in economic activity, and 10,000 full-time jobs in 2015.

Noah Glick

Recreational marijuana sales officially kicked off July 1 in Nevada. But what exactly does a retail cannabis brand look like?

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick explores that question.

Michelle Matus

A district court judge in Carson City has granted a preliminary injunction that prohibits the state of Nevada from issuing distribution licenses for recreational pot to anyone other than wholesale alcohol distributors.

The ruling could impact the start date for retail cannabis sales, which were set to begin on July first.

Noah Glick

Tuesday, 5:04 p.m. update:

A district court judge in Carson City has granted a preliminary injunction that prohibits the state of Nevada from issuing distribution licenses for recreational pot to anyone other than wholesale alcohol distributors.

Noah Glick

The cannabis industry is projected to surge dramatically with the legalization of recreational pot in several states, including Nevada. But it’s not just the dispensaries who stand to benefit.

Michelle Matus

Production and cultivation of marijuana are ramping up in Nevada, but development on a commercial scale comes with certain air quality challenges.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah visited a specialized greenhouse to learn more about the potential environmental impact of the cannabis industry.

California is the sixth largest economy in the world, based on gross domestic product. And in November, voters legalized recreational marijuana, something that will further diversify the state’s portfolio.

Michelle Matus

By legalizing recreational marijuana, Nevada voters have opened up the door for new businesses eager to serve this growing market.

But as Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports, getting into the retail cannabis game comes at a high cost.

Noah Glick

Communities along the Truckee, Carson and Walker Rivers can breathe a sigh of relief for now, as the National Weather Service has downgraded some of its flooding projections from last week. Reno Public Radio's Noah Glick reports.

Noah Glick

A new project in northern Nevada has finished up just in time to help keep the city of Fallon safe from potential spring runoff flooding.

But officials say it could actually protect the region for several decades.

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