Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

Governor Steve Sisolak is sitting at a desk with a sign language translator behind him as he addresses the state's move to phase one of reopening.
Legislative Counsel Bureau

Nearly two-months after shuttering non-essential businesses in Nevada, Governor Steve Sisolak says the state will move into phase one of reopening at 12:01 am Saturday morning. That means retail establishments, restaurants, barbershops and salons across the state can reopen tomorrow, but not without some restrictions. To help us break down the governor’s order, KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Bree Zender about the changes.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

10:08 p.m. | May 12, 2020

Washoe Co. Reports 40th COVID-19 Death Tuesday

By Bree Zender

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

8:18 p.m. | May 5, 2020
By Danna O'Connor

Washoe County Human Services Agency Contractor Tests Positive For COVID-19

Kristen McNeill standing at a podium during a press conference.
Paul Boger / KUNR

The Washoe County School District Board of Trustees has named Kristen McNeill the district’s permanent superintendent. But the appointment comes at a tumultuous time. The COVID-19 pandemic has closed schools and projected budget deficits threaten potential cuts. Officials said they’re confident that McNeill’s the person to lead the district through the storm.

A white wall with the "VOTE" spray painted in black.
MYKL ROVENTINE / Creative Commons

Thousands of delegates were set to participate in Nevada’s Democratic county conventions over the weekend. But like nearly every aspect of life over the past month, the novel coronavirus pandemic has forced party leaders to push the process online.

The five Washoe County Commissioners stand in front of a white fence.
Washoe County Commission

The Washoe County Commission is backing a potential lawsuit meant to overturn emergency restrictions on antimalarial drugs used to treat COVID-19.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

9:21 p.m. | April 28, 2020
By Danna O'Connor

Statewide Death Toll Is Now 225, Washoe Co. Death Toll Is 29

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

9:23 p.m. | April 21, 2020
By Danna O'Connor

Nevada Gov. Extends School Closures

The front entrance to the Washoe County School District Administration Building
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Later this month, the Washoe County School District Board of Trustees is expected to name Kristen McNeill the permanent superintendent. The decision comes after the board abruptly ended a monthlong national search amid the COVID-19 pandemic. KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Board of Trustees President Malena Raymond about the decision and what the district is doing to get community feedback before McNeill’s appointment.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Regional Novel Coronavirus Updates: Tuesday, April 14

10:47 p.m. | April 14, 2020 

By Danna O'Connor

Screenshot of Nevada lawmakers meeting virtually for the first time.
Screenshot / Nevada Legislative Counsel Bureau

Nevada lawmakers have approved a plan to spend $8.2 million in state money to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

An orange and white closed sign hangs in a store window.
Benedikt Geyer / Pixabay

When Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak issued a directive to partially lockdown the state, he warned that businesses choosing to remain open may face penalties. What he didn't do is set specific guidelines on how to enforce the order. Instead, that responsibility was largely left to local law enforcement.

Green monopoly houses sit in a row against a stark, white background.
woodleywonderworks / Flickr Creative Commons

Like the rest of the country, Nevada is seeing a record-breaking spike in unemployment claims. In response, Governor Steve Sisolak placed a moratorium on evictions during the COVID-19 pandemic. KUNR’s Paul Boger reached out to Rita Greggio, a lawyer with Washoe Legal Services, a nonprofit legal aid organization, to talk about what the governor’s directive means.

Durmick said, "The census is going to possibly create over $67 billion in funding for the state … which will go for things like public health and education and infrastructure, which the state is definitely going to need after the COVID-19 pandemic."
Crystal Willis / KUNR Public Radio

Sixty-seven billion dollars. That’s the amount of federal money census officials say Nevada stands to gain over the next decade. But with the current COVID-19 pandemic disrupting nearly every aspect of daily life, how are census takers ensuring an accurate count? KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Kerry Durmick, statewide census coordinator for Nevada Census 2020, to get an update.

Interim Superintendent Kristen McNeill stands at a podium speaking to reporters during a press conference.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

The Washoe County School District Board of Trustees has voted to end its search for a new superintendent and will likely name Interim Superintendent Kristen McNeill to the district’s top position. 

Libros de texto sobre en un escritorio en un salón de clase.
Alexa Ard

Las escuelas públicas de Nevada permanecen cerradas como parte del esfuerzo del estado para luchar contra la propagación de coronavirus. Pero para evitar que los estudiantes pierdan terreno a mitad del año académico, los distritos están recurriendo a planes de educación a distancia — osea por Internet. Para hablar de lo que esto significa para los 64,000 estudiantes inscritos en las escuelas del condado de Washoe, Paul Boger con la radio pública KUNR habló con Debbie Beirsdorff, la directora académica del distrito.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Tuesday, April 7

9:07 p.m. | April 7, 2020 
By Danna O'Connor

Fifth COVID-19 Death Announced In Washoe Co.

Textbooks sitting on a desk in a classroom.
Alexa Ard

Public schools across Nevada remain closed as part of the state’s ongoing effort to fight the spread of the novel coronavirus. But to prevent students from losing ground midway through the academic year, districts are turning to distance learning plans. To talk about what that means for the 64,000 students enrolled in Washoe County schools, KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Debbie Biersdorff, the district’s chief academic officer.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Thursday, March 26

9:19 p.m. | March 26, 2020
By Paul Boger

Nevada Cases Surpass 500

 

The number of COVID-19 cases in Nevada jumped by 115 on Thursday, bringing the statewide total to 535. That’s according to a late-night update of the state’s coronavirus dashboard. 

Kazmierski said, "Our community works well together and I'm confident that we will get through this in [the] not too distant future. In 90 days, we'll start to see a fairly reasonable recovery."
Paul Boger / KUNR

For roughly a decade, Nevada has maintained one of the fastest-growing economies in the country. But with non-essential businesses across the state shuttered due to the threat of the novel coronavirus, that economy is likely going to take a hit. Just how big of an impact COVID-19 will have remains to be seen. To suss that out, KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Mike Kazmierski, CEO of the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada about the state’s economy and what recovery may look like.

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