Paul Boger

News Reporter

Paul grew up in Phoenix and earned his B.S. in Broadcast Journalism from Troy University in Alabama where he worked as a producer, editor and local host for Troy Public Radio. Paul then spent several years at Mississippi Public Broadcasting as the legislative and education reporter. His work there was featured on several NPR newscasts, All Things Considered, Morning Edition, PBS Newshour and the BBC.

He’s also collaborated with the NPR Ed and the Southern Education Desks on stories that have aired across the Southeast. That work has earned Paul several Mississippi AP Broadcasters Association Awards and a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award.

Paul is looking forward to calling Reno his new home. When he’s not working you can find him and his wife, Lynsey, playing with their dog, Hank. He also enjoys reading, running, hiking, camping, playing board games, collecting postcards, road tripping and, of course, listening to public radio and podcasts.

The bipartisan group of female lawmakers in the Nevada Legislature.
Nevada's Legislative Councel Bureau

This week marks the 100th anniversary of Congress passing the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote. Now, a century later, the nation's first female-majority legislature has wrapped up their work in Carson City, Nevada.

The Nevada Senate
Jana Sayson

Nevada's 2019 legislative session is officially over. To help break down the session and the hundreds of measures passed over the past four months, KUNR's Paul Boger chats with Bree Zender.

Lawmakers hold a "behind-the-bar" committee meeting as the last day of the legislative session quickly approaches.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

At midnight, Nevada’s 2019 legislative session will be over. But even though there are less than 24 hours until sine die, lawmakers still have a lot left on their agenda. To discuss the latest from the Capital City, we turn to KUNR’s Senior Political Reporter Paul Boger.

Educators rally outside the Nevada Legislature in support for increased school spending.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Lawmakers in Nevada are set to approve a measure meant to overhaul the state’s education funding mechanism. The measure would, in part, streamline the funding process and move the state to what's called a student weighted funding formula. Supporters say the change would add transparency while at the same time sending money to where it's most needed. Opponents, however, argue this bill would hurt rural districts.

Educators rally outside the Nevada Legislature in support for increased school spending.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Lawmakers in the Nevada Senate are advancing a bill that could totally overhaul the way the state pays for public K-12 education. Senate Bill 543 would move the state away from the 52-year-old Nevada Plan to what’s called a weighted student formula. To breakdown what that means and how the shift could affect education for years to come, KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Zahava Stadler, the Policy Director for Ed-Build, a national non-profit that studies the way states pay for schools.

Flanked by lawmakers and advocates, Governor Steve Sisolak signs AB431.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Governor Steve Sisolak has approved a measure that will restore the voting rights of thousands of ex-felons upon the completion of their sentence or parole.

Lawmakers are considering a measure that could implement what are known as "Red Flag" laws.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

A bill to tighten portions of Nevada’s gun laws is picking up steam after a month-long delay. 

Abortion rights activists demonstrate on the steps of the Legislative Building in Carson City to show support for SB179, the Trust Nevada Woeman Act.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

A measure that would officially decriminalize abortion in Nevada and loosen portions of the state's informed consent laws will soon be on Governor Steve Sisolak’s desk. The "trust Nevada Women Act comes at a time when other states have tightened abortion laws, and, in some cases, virtually banned the practice outright.

The Nevada Senate
Jana Sayson / KUNR Public Radio

With little more than two weeks until the end of 2019’s legislative session, lawmakers in Carson City are beginning to work feverishly to put the final touches on hundreds of pieces of legislation. To break some of that down for us, I’m joined KUNR’s Political Reporter Paul Boger.

Students and supporters rally on the steps of the Capitol during National School Choice Week.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

There are more than 2,300 students currently enrolled in Nevada’s Educational Choice Scholarship Program, otherwise known as Opportunity Scholarships. It gives students from low and middle-income families aid to help pay tuition at qualified private K-12 schools. While the program has remained popular since its inception, Democratic leaders are considering a measure that would cap the program at current levels.

Lawmakers in the Nevada Assembly are set to pass a measure that could overhaul the state's criminal justice system.
THOMAS HAWK / CREATIVE COMMONS

A bill aimed at making sweeping reforms to Nevada’s criminal justice system is making its way through the legislature. 

What Firefighters' Stories Can Teach Us

May 15, 2019
two firefighters hold hose in front of blaze
Unsplash

Firefighters work in high-stress, high-stakes environments, constantly making choices in the face of cascading uncertainty. They’re putting their lives on the line and taking into consideration everything that’s in the path of a blaze, including people, property, animals, and even environmental resources, like water.

Assemblyman Jim Wheeler, flanked by his fellow Republicans, answers questions from reporters.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

With just a little more than a month left in Nevada's legislative session, hundreds of bills still remain up for consideration. That includes dozens of measures introduced by minority Republicans. KUNR's Paul Boger spoke with Assembly Minority Leader Jim Wheeler in Carson City to discuss whether Republicans are seeing the bipartisanship they were guaranteed by Democrats.

"Welcome to Nevada" sign from the side of I-80 east
Famartin via Wikimedia Commons

Census data shows Nevada is the fastest growing state in the nation. Historically, most of that growth has come from Californians moving East. But in recent years, that growth has led to some backlash among conservative Nevadans who see the influx of Californians as the number one reason the state has begun to shift from solid red to purple and, now, blue. KUNR's Paul Boger has the story.

Lawmakers in Nevada are advancing hundreds of bills after a lat night deadline.
Jana Sayson / KUNR Public Radio

A proposed constitutional amendment aimed at appointing judges and a measure that would have legalized physician-assisted suicide were among the victims of the latest deadline in the Nevada 2019 legislative session. KUNR’s Political Reporter Paul Boger has the latest.

Lawmakers in Nevada are advancing legislation that would, among other things, increase the state's minimum wage, decriminalize abortion and require utility providers to get at least 50 percent of their energy from renewable sources. 

There are currently 52 bills sponsored by Assembly Republicans still alive in the Nevada legislature. Reno Assemblywoman Jill Tolles introduced several of them. She spoke with KUNR's Paul Boger from her office in Carson City about her take on some of that legislation and whether lawmakers have been willing to work in a bipartisan fashion this session.

Resiliency In The Face Of Climate Change

Apr 17, 2019

Climate change is becoming a reality. According to NASA, over the next century, our planet is likely going to see some pretty significant changes. We’re already seeing rising sea levels due to the melting ice caps, along with storms that are stronger and more frequent.

For people living in the American West, the snowpack is becoming less predictable. Summers are longer and hotter, and severe droughts are pushing us to become more reliant on water reserves. Perhaps most notably, those hotter, drier summers are resulting in more and more wildfires.

Examining Fire Resilience In The American West

Apr 16, 2019
Smoke and burned trees from a wildfire
Photo by Joanne Francis on Unsplash

The ecosystems of the American West are under threat from climate change. Analysis by the Bureau of Land Management says areas like the Great Basin are particularly susceptible, with invasive species, increasing temperatures and years of extreme drought, putting the country’s largest desert at risk. 

The Nevada State Legislative Building in Carson City.
Alexa Ard

278! That’s the number of bills and resolutions that are no longer up for consideration after a Friday night deadline killed nearly one-quarter of all the measures introduced into Nevada’s 2019 legislative session. To get the latest, we check in now with KUNR’s Senior Political Reporter Paul Boger.

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