KUNR Public Radio: Local News Feed

A local news stream from the KUNR Public Radio newsroom and regional partners.

The risk of contracting COVID-19 in the Truckee Meadows is currently “very high.” That’s according to the latest information from the Truckee Meadows COVID Risk Meter, a tool used by officials to determine the overall community risk posed by the novel coronavirus.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

4:50 p.m. | November 24, 2020

Reno Mayor Hillary Schieve Pleads With Residents To Follow New COVID-19 Restrictions, ‘Our Businesses Are Holding On By a Thread’
By Lucia Starbuck

In Nevada, nearly a quarter of all COVID-19 cases were identified this month, pushing Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak to impose new restrictions. The governor is calling it a “pause” — not a full shutdown.

Two rows of beds with beige blankets and covered in plastic. A sign above the area reads, “Parking. Upper Levels” with an arrow pointing to the right. There is also the letter “G.”
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

As COVID-19 cases continue to surge in Nevada, state leaders are concerned about preserving health care capacity. KUNR’s Jayden Perez reports that while new restrictions help safeguard the health care system, it can be hard on the business community.

On Tuesday night, the Washoe County School Board is considering moving all students to full distance learning starting Dec. 7, which is about a week after Thanksgiving. In this commentary, KUNR Youth Media reporter Hudson Heimerman says that with cases increasing in Washoe County, he's nervous going to school in person these days.

A landscape with hills and smoke filling the sky.
Bureau of Land Management California via Twitter

As of 4:55 p.m. PT on November 23, 2020, KUNR is no longer actively updating this blog. You can find information about this fire on Inciweb.

This blog included earlier updates from the Pinehaven Fire near Caughlin Ranch in Reno, Nev., from Tuesday, Nov. 17. For updates related to that fire, please visit our live blog

A long table with food dishes on it, including green beans, bread loaves, deviled eggs, chopped potatoes and cranberry sauce.
Isabella Wolf / KUNR Youth Media

Some families, like KUNR Youth Media reporter Isabella Wolf’s family, are making the difficult decision to stay home this Thanksgiving. In this audio diary, Wolf shares the family traditions that she’ll miss this year and what the holiday means to her.

An older man looks beyond the camera. He’s touching the bottom of his blue surgical mask. He is wearing a silver wedding ring. There is a blue curtain behind him.
David Calvert / Nevada Independent

Nearly a quarter of all COVID-19 cases in Nevada were identified just this month alone. During a press conference Sunday, Gov. Steve Sisolak announced he’s imposing tighter restrictions for the next three weeks, calling it a “pause” — not a full shutdown.

The vaccine developed by the pharmaceutical company Moderna may be easier to distribute in the rural West, according to regional public health experts.

It can survive up to a month in a freezer, is shipped in small doses, and it doesn't need a special, ultra-cold freezer to survive – unlike the vaccine developed by the company Pfizer.


A landscape with trees, hills and houses with smoke filling the air.
Jon Humbert

Editor's Note: As of Saturday, Nov. 21, KUNR is no longer actively updating this blog. For the most current information about the Pinehaven Fire, visit @RenoFireDept and @RenoPolice on Twitter or the City of Reno's website.

A young blonde girl sits on a white bench. She’s wearing a white shirt with the name, “Obama” drawn on it with a red, white, and blue circle below the name.
Avery Thunder / KUNR Youth Media

Even though she was too young to vote in this election, local high school student Avery Thunder shares this commentary for KUNR’s Youth Media program on how she feels about former Vice President Joe Biden being declared the winner. She also explores what she hopes his presidency will bring during the pandemic.

The Interior Department is facing criticism for putting up barriers to conservation projects nationwide funded through the new Great American Outdoors Act.

A quote from Steve Sisolak, the governor of Nevada. “The majority of our counties are deemed at-risk of increased transmission of COVID-19. To be blunt, our state is surging and continues to surge.”
Jayden Perez / KUNR

Governor Steve Sisolak announced that he is doing well despite contracting COVID-19; however, he warned Nevadans of the dangers that the coronavirus imposes on the state.

A long wall that’s waist high that says Bishop Manogue Catholic High School. There is a fence behind the wall that blocks access to a parking lot in the background.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

Limiting social gatherings has been challenging as COVID fatigue and social isolation set in during the pandemic. As KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck reports, public health measures aren’t being followed by everyone.

Back in 2018, the U.S. Geological Survey and several Western states formed the Corridor Mapping Team, a first-of-its-kind collaboration among state and federal wildlife biologists to map ungulate migrations.

Last week, the team published its first volume of maps, which document more than 40 big-game migration routes in Arizona, Idaho, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming.

Democrats once again lost ground in much of the rural West. That includes Montana, where Republicans swept the election for the first time in at least two decades. Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., will soon be the lone progressive holding federal office in the state. He's also the only working farmer in the U.S. Senate and author of a new book, Grounded: A Senator's Lessons On Winning Back Rural America. He spoke about lessons learned from November's election with reporter Nate Hegyi of the Mountain West News Bureau.

An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

6:50 p.m. | November 17, 2020

Washoe County Reports Two COVID-19-Related Deaths, 230 New Cases
By Lucia Starbuck

Washoe County reported two COVID-19-related deaths on Tuesday, a woman and man in their 80s, both with underlying health conditions. There are now 222 COVID-19-related deaths in the county.

Officials are also reporting 230 additional cases of COVID-19 today and 102 recoveries.

Audio Diary: Longing For A Brighter Fall

Nov 17, 2020
Hudson Heimerman is looking at the camera and smiling.
Hudson Heimerman / KUNR YOUTH MEDIA

With Thanksgiving around the corner, the Washoe County Health District is urging residents not to gather with people outside of their household. Hudson Heimerman is a student at Reno High School and a reporter for the KUNR Youth Media Program. In this audio postcard, he reflects on how this fall feels different and what he misses the most.

KUNR 2020 election blog. An illustrated silhouette of the state of Nevada with a red and blue striped background.
Crystal Willis / KUNR

As of Nov. 17, this blog will no longer be updated. For related articles, please visit our 2020 election webpage.

KUNR’s 2020 Election Blog is a space for updates throughout Election Day and night, as well as short articles based on conversations our reporters have had with community members and local stakeholders to provide greater context to the election process. Because of the heavy reliance on mail-in voting this election due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there may not be final results for some races on election night in 2020. We will post results and updates to this blog as they come in.

Going to a bar tonight in Boise, Idaho or Reno, Nev.?

There's about a 50-50 chance someone carrying COVID-19 will be there too.

 


A woman stares into the camera. She is standing and wearing a delicate Native American handmade necklace.
Christian Collins

Tsanavi Spoonhunter is an award-winning film director. Her documentary Crow Country: Our Right To Food Sovereignty was recently awarded best documentary short by the American Indian Film Festival. The film profiles tribal members of the Crow Indian Reservation in Montana and their struggles to retain food security. 

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