anxiety

An image of a character in Animal Crossing New Horizons sitting in a field of flowers
Nintendo

Between a global pandemic, the economic downturn and civil unrest across the country, Americans are facing high levels of stress and uncertainty, and many are turning to video games for relief.

This reporter happens to be one of them. But can these virtual experiences help in the real world?

A new report shows youth suicide rates have spiked alarmingly in recent years, especially in the Mountain West.

How to cope with severe anxiety.

Photo by Anh Gray

KUNR is exploring mental health issues among young people in our community. Yesterday, we reported there’s been more demand for counseling at college campuses nationwide due to increased anxiety. At the University of Nevada, Reno, that’s also the case. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores why.

"Happy Halloween!  Happy Halloween!"

Just last week, a couple of UNR students handed out candies and goodies like colorful, de-stressing squeeze balls on campus. The goal was to get students to stop by for a breather from mid-semester stress.

NOTE: This story originally aired on March 31, 2014.

For the last four years, Nevada Equine Assisted Therapy, or N.E.A.T, in Reno has often offered its horse therapy to children and teens with severe physical or cognitive issues, like cerebral palsy and autism. But as Michelle Bliss reports for KUNR’s series: Healing across the Sierra, a new clientele is emerging—adults looking for alternative ways of dealing with stress, anxiety, and depression.