Arts and Culture

A man in a khaki button down shirt stands at an angle in front of a tree.
Joshua Dugat

Elko's 35th annual Cowboy Poetry Gathering wrapped up this weekend. Nearly 50 poets, musicians and musical groups, including diverse and dynamic new voices, have shared their artistry. The event is older than Josh Dugat, a first-time presenter, whose poetry pays homage to the  boots that stood on stage before him. KUNR's Holly Hutchings has more with him. 

A woman with long brown hair and wearing a red mexican-style dress standing on a bridge.
Olivia Romo

The National Cowboy Poetry Gathering is underway in Elko, Nevada this week. One young poet taking the stage is Olivia Romo, a bilingual activist who uses her art to tackle environmental issues facing the West. She told KUNR’s Holly Hutchings why she thinks poetry can spark change.

TREVOR PAGLEN AND NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART

A piece of art the size of two school buses, and ten years in the making, is now orbiting Earth. Partnering with organizations in Northern Nevada, Berlin-based artist Trevor Paglen saw his sculpture take off and help change the way we see things in the night sky, as well as here on the ground. KUNR’s Holly Hutchings has more on the endeavor.

Bree Zender

Farmers across the country have been preparing to harvest turkeys for the Thanksgiving holiday. One school in Smith Valley is raising its own turkeys as a way to teach students how food gets from the farm to the plate. KUNR’s Bree Zender reports.

A blond woman stands on the grounds of a prison, between a guard tower and a mulit-level brick prison buildilng.
Lauren Casto

To pay back a medical school scholarship, Dr. Karen Gedney was required to work four years in an underserved area, and she got assigned to the Northern Nevada Correctional Center back in the 80's. It's a medium security facility outside of Carson City. Gedney ended up staying her whole career. She says the job was a 'calling' that provided her the chance to be a real healer. Her new book, 30 Years Behind Bars, chronicles her experiences as a prison doc, and KUNR’s Holly Hutchings spoke with her about it.  

Brown metal vines with glass leaves wrap around patio posts at a Reno restaurant. They were fashioned by local artisans, commissioned by Tilio Lagatta. Lagatta's company redevelops buildings and has been including art to add punch and hopefully value.
Holly Hutchings

A report from The U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis shows that arts and cultural production accounted for over $6 billion of the silver state's economy in 2015. As KUNR's Holly Hutchings reports, business leaders are looking for ways to use cultural contributions to grow and improve their industries.

Holly Hutchings

An exhibit paying homage to the 1960 Squaw Valley Winter Olympics is on display at the Truckee Community Recreation Center. Everything from vintage uniforms and rarely seen photography to illustrations by Walt Disney --a huge fan of skiing--are also showcased. The memorabilia are some of the last remaining vestiges of a games that changed winter sports and the Tahoe-Truckee region. Our arts reporter Holly Hutchings visited the exhibit and talked with one avid Olympic collector and author to learn more.

 Steve Benjamin mayor of Columbia, South Carolina speaks about his investments during his presidency with the U.S Confernece of Mayors .
Stephanie Serrano

A group of mayors from across the country are looking to Reno as an example of how arts and culture can power local economies. KUNR's Stephanie Serrano has more.

Holly Hutchings

Burning Man may be held in the Nevada desert, but its interest and appeal has a much wider reach. Visitors come from all over the world to attend the week-long festival, and even more people who don't attend have their curiosity piqued by tales from the playa. Trevor Hughes, Reporter for USA Today, has captured stories there for three years and stopped by our studio to talk to our arts reporter, Holly Hutchings before he headed up for burn number four.

Holly Hutchings

Michael Mikel is a co-founder of Burning Man, the international anti-establishment festival in the desert, and has been involved since 1988. He still attends and has a small camp on the outskirts of the playa, where he says it feels more like the Burning Man of the early days; fewer people and a clear view of the expansive desert canvas. Ideas of the festival’s future come more freely to him there. He says they’ve developed systems that allow the organization to change and live on long after he and the other originators are gone. Our reporter Holly Hutchings sat down with Mikel to talk Burning Man.

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