Arts and Culture

By BLM Nevada (Burning Man 2015) via Wikimedia Commons

Since its inception, the counterculture festival known as Burning Man has been a utopia for art and artists. Massive installations color the Black Rock Desert, even down to the very foundation on which the iconic “Man” stands. Our reporter Holly Hutchings caught up with the designer of the base to see what it’s all about.

Holly Hutchings

Sculpture artist Peter Hazel is heading to Burning Man for his sixth time this year. And, he hopes the massive jellyfish creation he’s crafted for the dusty artistic showcase will catapult his craft to new levels. Our reporter Holly Hutchings caught up with Hazel where he works at Artech, a shared workspace in Reno. 

Three musicians stand in front of a grafitti wall with instruments
Michelle Matus

Bilingual musician Sonia De Los Santos, with band members Sinuhé Padilla and Martín Vejarano, recently visited Reno, Nevada as part of Artown. During their stay, KUNR and Noticerio Móvil organized a pop-up musical event for the children of the Boys and Girls Club of Truckee Meadows.

Watch her performance and hear why she believes sharing Latin American and American folk music is important for children across the United States.

Reno's Street Art Becomes Virtual Reality

Jul 27, 2018
A women wears a black headset in front of a large TV.
Krysta Scripter

Over the last several years, artists in Reno have created many colorful murals around town. The University of Nevada, Reno is archiving that street art digitally, some of which can be experienced in virtual reality. KUNR’s Krysta Scripter stopped by a demo to check it out.

 

A photo at night of a lit-up sign reading "Dragon Lights Festival" with brightly colored, lit-up fish and flowers surrounding it.
Alli Warner

Through the first week of August, Wilbur D. May Arboretum in Reno will be illuminated by nearly forty larger-than-life Chinese lanterns. The touring festival Dragon Lights displays crafted designs in an effort to share their centuries-old tradition and their culture. Our reporter Holly Hutchings checked it out.

Holly Hutchings

Dickerson Road is a one-mile, dead end street in an industrial area of Reno. It has a gritty history, including crime, motorcycle clubs and even a hippie commune at one point. Now, it’s experiencing a revitalization and becoming a haven for artists.

Image of Jake Shimabukuro performing on-stage
Artown / Jake Shimabukuro

Artown is underway in Reno, and along with some big names, this year’s month-long celebration of the arts also includes a master of a small instrument: the ukulele.

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick caught up with ukulele musician Jake Shimabukuro over the phone during his current tour.

A man stands at a podium under a large white tent raising his hat and bowing his head with a group of people behind him also bowing their heads
Holly Hutchings

The Stewart Indian School in Carson City opened in 1890. Like similar schools across the country, the original goal was to assimilate Native American children and eliminate their culture and traditions. It closed its doors 90 years later in 1980. On Wednesday, alumni, tribal leaders and government officials gathered for a blessing ceremony for the future Stewart Indian School Cultural Center and Museum, which will open next year. Our reporter Holly Hutchings has the story.

Nevada Museum of Art

This Saturday, July 14, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony joins with the Nevada Museum of Art to celebrate Native American art, culture, community and tradition.  The event features Native American artists, dancers storytellers and musicians from a variety of cultures, including Paiute, Washoe,  Shoshone, Pala and Patwin.  The celebration is free from 10am to 5pm at the Nevada Museum of Art. 

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