climate

It was a dry start to the year for some mountain ranges in the region, but recent storms brought most Mountain West snowpack levels back to normal.

 


Map shows the odds of reaching 100% of normal precipitation by the end of the water year based on how much precipitation has been observed so far this water year and how much has historically been observed during the remaining months in the water year.
Center For Western Weather and Water Extremes / Scripps Institution of Oceanography

It’s been one of the driest starts to the water year across parts of the Mountain West, but that doesn’t mean there’s cause for alarm just yet.

For the second time this year, kids around the world are striking from school to demand action around climate change. And it’s happening just before world leaders gather at the UN Climate Action Summit in New York City. There were only a handful of strikes in our region last time but this time there are several dozen.

What Firefighters' Stories Can Teach Us

May 15, 2019
two firefighters hold hose in front of blaze
Unsplash

Firefighters work in high-stress, high-stakes environments, constantly making choices in the face of cascading uncertainty. They’re putting their lives on the line and taking into consideration everything that’s in the path of a blaze, including people, property, animals, and even environmental resources, like water.

Two skiers stand on snowy mountains.
Amy Westervelt

Several feet of snow have fallen around the Lake Tahoe region but a report by the Department of Energy says Tahoe will see a significant decline of snow levels over the next 80 years. 

Farmers Air Water Woes At Drought Forum

Aug 20, 2015
Julia Ritchey

A host of worried farmers testified at a panel gauging the effect of drought in Nevada at a state hearing in Sparks Wednesday. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey reports.

 

Representatives from the cattle, wool and farming industries spoke at the Nevada Drought Forum, arguing against any further cutbacks in water allocation.

The farmers said the drought and subsequent water restrictions had slashed their incomes, increased operating costs and made it hard to plan for the future.