COVID-19

A row of different shaped and colored tents along a fence with tall casinos in the background.
Lucia Starbuck / Our Town Reno

Friday, the Reno-Tahoe Airport Authority Board will decide if ex-military barracks in Stead can be used as emergency housing for the houseless during the COVID-19 pandemic. KUNR’s Stephanie Serrano and Lucia Starbuck discussed how people without stable shelter are feeling, and what's being done to protect this vulnerable population.

Ethel Branch is the former attorney general of the Navajo Nation. A few weeks ago, when she went grocery shopping in Flagstaff, Arizona, she noticed that the shelves were already pretty bare. That worried her. For shoppers from the nearby Navajo Nation, a grocery store can be hours away.

¿Qué Necesita Saber Acerca Del Coronavirus? Tenemos Respuestas

Mar 26, 2020
Una renderización del virus COVID-19.
ILUSTRACIÓN DEL CDC

Mientras los casos del coronavirus se siguen propagando por el Medio Oeste, sabemos que hay muchas preguntas acerca del virus — incluyendo cómo evitar contagiarse. También sabemos que hay mucha información incorrecta acerca del virus, así que queremos ayudarte a separar los hechos de la ficción. Envíe sus preguntas a health@wfyi.org o envíe un mensaje de texto con la palabra “eleccion” al 73224, y encontraremos las respuestas.

“The snow’s going sideways, it’s swirling,” said Billy Barr, from the abandoned silver mine he lives in almost 10,000 feet up in the Rocky Mountains.

We’re all social distancing these days, and it’s unclear when exactly that will end. But Barr has been doing this for almost 50 years. He’s the only full-time resident of Gothic, Colorado. 

“I'm the mayor and chief of police,” he said. “I hold elections every year but I don't tell anybody when they are, so it works out really well.”

Exterior of the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory in Reno, Nevada.
University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine

COVID-19 testing shortages nationwide have been a significant issue. Nevada is now one of several states that have notified the Food and Drug Administration that it’s making modifications to the test in an effort to mitigate shortages statewide.

Dr. Mark Pandori heads the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory. He talked with KUNR’s Anh Gray to break down the process involved in the development of the modified test.

COVID-19 fears have forced a lot of bars and restaurants to close across the Mountain West. That leaves workers in a tough spot. But some communities have found a creative way for would-be customers to chip in.


The coronavirus pandemic has led to a national shortage of personal protection equipment for medical personnel such as face masks and gowns, and crafters are lending a hand.

 


Los proveedores de salud en St. Mary's se paran juntos con carteles de papel que dicen, "quédense en casa, nos quedaremos en el trabajo por ustedes, gracias por quedarse en casa por nosotros, siempre abierto"
Anh Gray / KUNR

El gobernador Steve Sisolak anunció el cierre de escuelas, casinos y empresas no esenciales en todo el estado para frenar la propagación de coronavirus. La medida es para salvar vidas y evitar que el sistema de salud se inunde. Pero como informa Anh Gray de KUNR, la falta de recursos cruciales, incluyendo máscaras protectoras e incluso proveedores, ya está presionando al sistema.

Kazmierski said, "Our community works well together and I'm confident that we will get through this in [the] not too distant future. In 90 days, we'll start to see a fairly reasonable recovery."
Paul Boger / KUNR

For roughly a decade, Nevada has maintained one of the fastest-growing economies in the country. But with non-essential businesses across the state shuttered due to the threat of the novel coronavirus, that economy is likely going to take a hit. Just how big of an impact COVID-19 will have remains to be seen. To suss that out, KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Mike Kazmierski, CEO of the Economic Development Authority of Western Nevada about the state’s economy and what recovery may look like.

San Miguel County in Colorado announced this week it plans to test everyone in the county for COVID-19. And they’ll be using a blood test rather than the usual nose-and-throat swabs. 

The test typically being used at this point involves a method called PCR, which looks for pieces of the virus’ RNA in a person’s nose and throat. It only shows if someone is actively fighting and shedding the virus.

A microscopic picture of coronavirus
NIAID / Flickr/Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

As many Nevadans face hardships ahead due to restrictions aimed at preventing the spread of the novel coronavirus, some are looking to the government for relief. Nevada U.S. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto has been involved in some of the decision-making regarding these federal relief packages. She spoke Friday with KUNR's Bree Zender.

The National Congress of American Indians warned reporters in a press conference Friday that COVID-19 is a “recipe for a disaster” for tribal nations. 

An image of customers checking out at a grocery store.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Walk into many grocery stores these days, and you’ll see two things: crowds and empty shelves. You may also notice narrow aisles and checkout lines that make it hard to practice the social distancing recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While many businesses are shutting down to help stop the spread of COVID-19, grocery stores don’t have that luxury. And grocery workers like cashiers don’t make that much - at most, around $15 an hour. But like health care workers, they’re considered essential.

Updated at 8:55 p.m. ET

Vice President Mike Pence and his wife have both tested negative for COVID-19, his office announced on Saturday.

"Pleased to report that the COVID-19 test results came back negative for both Vice President @Mike_Pence and Second Lady @KarenPence," Katie Miller, the vice president's press secretary, said in a tweet.

Amid the COVID-19 epidemic, blood drives on campuses and corporate offices across the Mountain West have been cancelled. That's led to a "severe blood shortage."

State and local governments around our region are reacting to the coronavirus pandemic. A new analysis finds some are more aggressive than others. The Mountain West states got the least aggressive ranking, with Wyoming ranked dead last.

An image of the Las Vegas strip with a storm cloud looming overhead.
Thomas Hawk / Flickr

The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing federal, state and local governments to take drastic measures. And in Nevada, Gov. Steve Sisolak did something never done before: he ordered all casinos in the state to shut down for 30 days.

Woman types on computer.
Evolution Labs / Flickr/Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

In response to the spread of coronavirus, schools across the nation, including the University of Nevada, Reno, are transitioning to online learning for a period of time. This adjustment can be a challenge for some students; particularly those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Man in protective gear shows medical equipment
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Some people who have flu-like symptoms may not be sure if they should get tested for COVID-19. The Washoe County Health District has a set of criteria for who should be tested. The criteria the district sets is based on recommendations from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Coronavirus In Nevada: Live Blog

Mar 5, 2020
An illustration of an ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus In Nevada Updates: Wednesday, March 18

10:17 p.m. PDT | March 18, 2020
By Michelle Billman

State Total Of COVID-19 Cases Hits 85

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