Education | KUNR

Education

Most kids around the country are back in classrooms by now, but this school year isn't quite the return-to-normalcy that everyone had hoped for. Covid-19 cases are surging again, and many school districts have already closed due to outbreaks. Others are offering remote learning options.

Members of the Nevada Assembly are all standing and facing the center of a conference room.
Paul Boger / KUNR

The 81st Session of the Nevada Legislature is officially over after lawmakers approved one of the largest ever tax increases on the state's mining industry. The move is expected to generate millions in state revenue for education. To explain the change, KUNR Morning Edition host Noah Glick spoke with political editor Paul Boger.

The Nevada Assembly gavels out.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada lawmakers have successfully negotiated one of the largest mining tax increases in state history. The bill’s passage caps off a tumultuous session in which lawmakers added nearly hundreds of millions of dollars in new funding for schools. KUNR’s Paul Boger reports.

Two people walk past a wall of framed photos in the Nevada Legislature.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

There are only four days left in Nevada's 81st legislative session, and lawmakers are scrambling to get bills out of the door and onto the governor's desk. That includes appropriating billions in state dollars to fund the government over the next two years. To talk about that, KUNR Morning Edition host Noah Glick spoke with political editor Paul Boger.

Multiple people are sitting in a semicircle-shaped auditorium. There is a podium at the front of the room.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Portions of Nevada’s economy have recovered faster than previously predicted, and lawmakers are using that to their advantage. This week, the legislature’s two finance committees took steps to finalize the budget. The effort includes a new education funding formula and an additional $500 million for the state’s K-12 education system. To help explain what that means for students, KUNR host Michele Ravera spoke with political editor Paul Boger.

The term "critical race theory" has made its way into public debates over education in the Mountain West, and how students should be taught about race and racism. But it's not clear that any K-12 schools in our region actually employ the decades-old academic framework. And as right-wing officials portray it as radical, those who study critical race theory say its meaning is being misconstrued.

Critical race theory is, in short, an approach to understanding structural racism in the United States.

President Biden has laid out his vision for the future of public education, which includes a nationwide community college tuition waiver for all Americans who want to take advantage.

That waiver would be especially impactful in states with the lowest levels of higher education attainment, including several in the Mountain West. In Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming and New Mexico, fewer than 30% of adults over 25 have a bachelor's degree.

The exterior of the Nevada State Legislative Building in Carson City.
Alexa Ard / KUNR

The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally changed almost every aspect of daily life. Nowhere might that be more apparent than in the classroom. Nearly half a million K-12 students in Nevada have endured months of learning remotely or through hybrid instruction showing up to school every other day. Experts predict that when students do return to school, they will have forgotten many of the things they've learned over the last year. That's why lawmakers are considering a number of bills meant to address those issues. To talk about that and more, KUNR's Morning Edition Host Noah Glick spoke with Political Reporter Paul Boger.

An image of Senate Majority Leader Nicole Cannizzaro.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

Here are your local morning news headlines for Tuesday, Apr. 20, 2021.

A stack of legislative bills being placed in cubbies.
David Calvert / The Nevada Independent

With less than six weeks until the end of the 2021 legislative session, the general public can, once again, enter the Legislative Building in Carson City, albeit, with some hoops. KUNR's Political Editor, Paul Boger spoke with Morning Edition host Noah Glick about the latest from the Capital City.

Student And Teacher Reflect On A Year Of The Pandemic

Mar 18, 2021
Janelle Olisea and Greg Burge stand six feet apart in a classroom.
Janelle Olisea

The pandemic has caused historic disruption to education, and many students are struggling. KUNR Youth Media alum Janelle Olisea is a senior at the Academy of Arts, Careers and Technology in Reno. She sits down with her English teacher Mr. Greg Burge. They open up to each other about how they’ve been working to push through some of the challenges and reflect on a few rewarding moments along the way.

An empty auditorium for performances. There is a microphone in the foreground and seating in the background.
abbyladybug / Flickr Creative Commons

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Monday, Mar. 8, 2021.

Exterior of the Washoe County School District administration building.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

The Washoe County school board recently entertained the idea of cutting the district's gifted and talented program. With Nevada's tax revenues continuing to languish because of the pandemic, the state's public education system is facing a serious budget crunch. To get a sense of how the legislative session may impact Northern Nevada's largest school district, KUNR's Paul Boger spoke with Lindsay Anderson, the district's government affairs director, at a recent school board meeting.

A person looking at a computer screen. They are getting ready to fill out the census online.
U.S. Census Bureau

The deadline to fill out the 2020 census is quickly approaching, and according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Nevada has surpassed its 2010 census self-response rate.

Promotional graphic for the event, featuring the headshots of the three panelists.
KUNR

Lee en español. 

With the fall semester underway for public schools across the state, KUNR recently hosted a Facebook Live event in Spanish, with health and education experts, to answer community questions. 

Our bilingual reporter Natalie Van Hoozer moderated the Q&A and spoke with Jayden Perez to recap the main takeaways from the discussion.

A student is sitting in a desk facing the front of a classroom and is holding a pencil down on a piece of paper.
Elineriipers / Flickr Creative Commons

Lee en español.

For weeks, community members have been asking the Washoe County School District Board of Trustees to set a threshold that would use specific metrics to determine if and when the district would stop in-person instruction during the pandemic. Some trustees said in a meeting Tuesday they do not want to draw a hard line.

Rows of red school chairs placed in an empty classroom.
dcJohn / Flickr Creative Commons

As many schools across our region are turning to distance learning to prevent further spread of the novel coronavirus, districts are concerned about how to enforce attendance for remote students.

Una papel con fórmulas matemáticas y una pluma.
BackOnTheBus / Flickr Creative Commons

Read in English. 

En agosto, José Piceno comenzó su quinto año como profesor de matemáticas en la escuela secundaria de Sparks en el condado de Washoe. 

Este otoño, las clases en las escuelas secundarias del condado están operando bajo un estilo híbrido que significa que los alumnos asisten a clases en persona parte del tiempo y hacen la otra parte de la clase en línea. 

La reportera Natalie Van Hoozer habló con Piceno sobre su experiencia con el regreso al aula. 

A photo of a lined piece of paper with math equations, with a pen resting on top.
BackOnTheBus / Flickr Creative Commons

Lee en español. 

Last week, José Piceno started his fifth year as a math teacher at Sparks High School in Washoe County.  

High schools in the county are operating with a hybrid model this fall, meaning some coursework is in-person and some is online. 

Our reporter Natalie Van Hoozer talked to Piceno about his experience returning to the classroom. 

A photography class. Students are sitting down and looking toward a stage with lights and cameras.
Leo P. Hidalgo / Flickr Creative Commons

Hunter Rand works as a video production and broadcast journalism instructor at Spanish Springs High School in Washoe County. He’s only been a teacher for one school year, so the pandemic has already impacted a significant portion of his teaching career.

KUNR reporter Natalie Van Hoozer spoke with Rand to explore how he’s been preparing for school starting back up.

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