education finance

Erika Castro en la Legislatura de Nevada
Michelle Rindels

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A Erika Castro le tomó años hacer trabajos ocasionales, cuidar niños y limpiar casas con tal de poder pagar la universidad. Como estudiante indocumentada, enfrentó más barreras para conseguir ayuda financiera que los ciudadanos de los Estados Unidos, quienes simplemente pueden llenar la Solicitud Gratuita para Ayuda Federal a Estudiantes (FAFSA) y obtener una beca federal Pell.

Erika Castro at the Nevada State Legislature
Michelle Rindels.

Lee en español.

For Erika Castro, it took years of doing odd jobs, babysitting and cleaning houses to be able to afford college. As an undocumented student, she faced more barriers in her quest for financial aid than U.S. citizens who can simply fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and land a Pell grant. Neither Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients nor undocumented students without DACA can receive federal aid.

la Universidad de Nevada, Reno
Cortesía de la Universidad de Nevada, Reno

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Legisladores estatales quieren comenzar a ofrecer ayuda financiera basada en la necesidad de estudiantes de UNR y UNLV, pero funcionarios proyectan que costará $126 millones de dólares cada dos años para que alcance a proveer fondos suficientes a todos los estudiantes que pudieran usarla.

la Universidad de Nevada, Reno
Cortesía de la Universidad de Nevada, Reno

Lee en español.

State lawmakers want to start offering need-based financial aid to UNR and UNLV students, but officials project it will cost $126 million every two years to provide sufficient grants to all students who could use it.

Alexa Ard

A new law went into effect this month that now requires every school district in Nevada to provide performance-based bonuses to some of its teachers and administrators. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

Steve Canavero is interim superintendent of public instruction, and he says the main goal of this new law is to find and reward the right people.

Alexa Ard

 

School choice is a phrase you’ve been hearing a lot lately as Nevada rolls out its education savings account program, which gives parents funds for alternative schooling. Debates over the program are highlighting broader issues in education funding.  To begin with, the Nevada State Plan, which governs school funding in the state, hasn’t actually been updated since 1967.