fishing

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has greenlighted the expansion of hunting and fishing access to more than 2.3 million acres and 147 wildlife refuges and fish hatcheries across the nation.


As the Mountain West grows and hunter numbers decline, states are finding ways to bring in more revenue to fund conservation.

Interview: The Threats Facing Monster Fish

Mar 18, 2016
Steve Shadley

Scientists say climate change and increasing demands on the world's rivers are harming enormous freshwater fish that can weigh more than 200 pounds. As Reno Public Radio’s Steve Shadley reports, one museum is helping the public understand the challenges ahead for so-called Monster Fish.

The Discovery Museum in downtown Reno is full of children excited to see replicas of giant fish from India and other parts of Asia. Our tour guide is Zeb Hogan. He's a University of Nevada, Reno biologist and host of Monster Fish, a TV series produced by National Geographic.

John Fochetti (jf.clearwaterlodge@gmail.com)

We recently posted a photo on Facebook of a visiting fisherman named Nick Roberts holding a 23-pound Lahontan Cutthroat Trout that he caught at Pyramid Lake just outside Reno. Now, close to 350,000 people have seen that post and almost 4,000 have shared it. So, what's the story behind that big fish? 

Nevada Department of Wildlife

Wildlife officials have been salvaging fish from ditches around Reno that are depleted because of the ongoing drought.

Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports that the operation saved about six thousand fish.

The Truckee Meadows Water Authority usually operates the Washoe and Verdi ditches as hydroelectric power sources, but the authority shut down all water flows to the ditches this week because of the drought.