flooding

A body of water with a pipe in the forefront and street signs with water surrounding them.
Bob Conrad / ThisisReno

Different solutions have been proposed to reduce water levels from the flooded Swan Lake in Lemmon Valley, a battle that has been affecting nearby residents since 2017. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck spoke with ThisisReno’s Bob Conrad about what’s been done, what can be expected, and how some residents are feeling.

Barriers stand up against a body of water.
Bob Conrad / This is Reno

Washoe County commissioners are taking steps to contain Lemmon Valley’s Swan Lake to a specified boundary, although county staff have cautioned that a solution to flooding in that area hasn’t been identified and funding questions remain. To learn more, KUNR’s News Director Michelle Billman spoke to Bob Conrad, the publisher of ThisisReno, to learn more about this issue.

Brown water from the Truckee River floods a staircase so that only the railings are visible.
Ty O'Neil

The Washoe Board of County Commissioners has approved language for a ballot measure that would increase property taxes for Truckee River flood mitigation. Voters will decide in November. Our News Director Michelle Billman spoke with Bob Conrad of ThisisReno to learn more.

Washoe County

So far, Washoe County has spent just over $3 million to clean up after historic flooding during the winter, and another $6 million in repair and capital improvement costs still remain to be covered. Our News Director Michelle Billman breaks down the situation with contributor Bob Conrad of ThisisReno.

Noah Glick

Communities along the Truckee, Carson and Walker Rivers can breathe a sigh of relief for now, as the National Weather Service has downgraded some of its flooding projections from last week. Reno Public Radio's Noah Glick reports.

Noah Glick

A new project in northern Nevada has finished up just in time to help keep the city of Fallon safe from potential spring runoff flooding.

But officials say it could actually protect the region for several decades.

Noah Glick

This year’s flooding has left many people in Northern Nevada either displaced or dealing with extensive property damage. But nowhere in the state may be as hard hit as Lemmon Valley.

The federal government is offering assistance to northern Nevada businesses and homeowners affected by January's winter storms. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports. 

The Small Business Administration is now offering disaster loans for those affected by this year’s severe weather that caused widespread flooding and forced hundreds of evacuations.

Rick Jenkins is public information officer for the agency.

Michelle Billman

State and local officials have been assessing flood damage in Northern Nevada, taking aerial tours of the region and inspecting on foot. Our News Director Michelle Billman joined the group as they visited downtown Reno to get the latest.

Andrea Landis

Monday, 6:20 p.m. update:

The following information has been compiled by KUNR from local press releases:

WEATHER:

The National Weather Service in Reno is predicting snow and increased winds through Wednesday. The flood risk is decreasing. However, officials urge residents to avoid the Truckee River and flooded areas. First responders are still urging the public to stay away from the Truckee River. The water is very cold and very fast and hypothermia can set in quickly.

 

During a flood, safety precautions like staying away from and not driving through flooded areas are the primary concerns Health Officer Kevin Dick is with the Washoe County Health District. He says people should also avoid coming into contact with flood waters, which could be contaminated and can pose several public health risks.

“People should presume that any flood waters that they see are contaminated with sewage, so it could be full of pathogens,” Dick explains, “and not something you want to be in contact with.”

What To Do Before, During, And After A Flood

Jan 6, 2017

NOTE: This information has been provided to KUNR by a press release from the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. It includes tips from the Red Cross, FEMA, the National Weather Service and University of Nevada, Reno, and was written by Lindsay Chichester, Carson City Extension Educator at University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. You can find more information at NevadaFloods.org

Reno Fire Chief David Cochran via Twitter

2 am Monday update:

As the Truckee River begins to level off in downtown Reno, the river is expected to crest between 6 am and noon Monday in Sparks. As of 2 am, there have been no flood-related injuries reported by REMSA, though about 400 dwellings in Washoe County and nine commercial buildings were evacuated. Our News Director Michelle Billman just spoke to Seth Williams, he's a division chief for Reno Fire, to get an update on flood conditions and to look ahead on what to expect for the morning commute.

Interview highlights:

Nick Ares / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Truckee River Flood Management Authority recently received $1.75 million dollars to create a flood plan for the region. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick sat down with their executive director, Jay Aldean, to discuss what that means.

One of his biggest tasks for Aldean and his agency is planning and building infrastructure that will protect the region from major storms and flooding.

Waterline Break Floods Pine Middle School

Dec 28, 2015
Julia Ritchey

After a waterline break at Pine Middle School flooded nearly the entire first floor, Washoe County school officials are scrambling to come up with a contingency plan. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey reports.

Maintenance crews discovered that a 4-inch valve disconnected above the cafeteria on Saturday, inundating the school with water while students were out on holiday break.

Chief facilities management officer Christopher Cobb listed the damages.

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

This week, we've been bringing you local coverage on climate change in light of the international climate deal just reached in Paris. In Washoe County, some officials are concerned about the threat of flooding this winter.