homeless youth

Mike Kazmierski stands on stage to give a presentation.
Kaleb M. Roedel / Nevada News Group

Nevada is one of the fastest growing states in the country, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, but that growth comes with challenges.

The Eddy House is the only youth homeless facility in Northern Nevada, and it's expanding later this month. As Nevada ranks highest in unaccompanied youth experiencing homelessness, the new facility will offer Reno its first 24-hour overnight shelter for young people. Listen as Diaz Dixon, CEO of the Eddy House, walked us through the new facility and explained how it's been designed to meet an individual's needs.

The Eddy House in Reno
Anh Gray

The Eddy House in downtown Reno is a drop-in center that helps homeless and at-risk youth in Northern Nevada. The organization recently announced plans to open a new 24-hour facility this fall. KUNR’s Anh Gray has more.

Michele Gehr is the director of the Eddy House.
Stephanie Serrano

On any given night there are, on average, 400 to 600 homeless youth living on the streets of Reno. That’s according to Michele Gehr, the director of the Eddy House, a trauma care drop-in center for homeless youth. She sat down with KUNR reporter Stephanie Serrano to talk about the severity of this problem.

“In 2017 we saw at Eddy House 769 unique youth. This is an issue because in 2015, when Eddy House opened as a drop-in center, there were about 100 kids. This year, 2018, we are slated to see nearly 1,000 homeless youth,” Gehr says.

Nico Colombant / Our Town Reno

Shawna Roseman was kicked out of her home when she was 17 while going to McQueen high school and ended up living a half dozen years on the streets, sleeping under bridges in downtown Reno, battling drug addiction and constantly running away from cops, before someone outside her family decided to take her in and help her out.

She told her story to Our Town Reno by the Truckee river where she used to sleep.

Camille Stuyvesant

Durante un día en el mes de enero, las ciudades en todo el país realizan una encuesta en cada condado para determinar la población sin hogar. En Reno, recientemente los organizadores llevaron a cabo este evento llamado Point-In-Time Count. A partir de esta encuesta se determinó que el número de jóvenes sin hogar entre los 18 y 24 años de edad está aumentando.  

Reno Youth Homelessness On The Rise According To Survey

Feb 2, 2018
Camille Stuyvesant

For one day in January, cities across the country hold a point-in-time count to survey the homeless population in their county. In Reno, organizers recently hosted an event to count homeless youths, specifically. They found that the number of 18-to-24 year-olds without a home is on the rise. 


U.S. Dept of Agriculture, Flickr (CC by 2.0)

The Nevada Department of Education has announced federal funds to help students experiencing homelessness. 

"In Nevada last year there were 17,172 students identified as homeless," says Mike Walker, state coordinator for homeless education. 

And, he says, that number has been increasing substantially over the last four to five years. That's where an annual grant from the Department of Education comes in.

Several non-profit agencies have 24 hours to count the number of homeless young people in Washoe County. KUNR's Anh Gray talks with a former resident of a home run by the Nevada Youth Empowerment Project, Miesha Mack, and the organization’s Executive Director Monica Dupea.