immigrants

Amaka Ozobia sitting in a conference room.
Daniel Clark / The Nevada Independent

Lee en español.

Amaka Ozobia’s parents came to the United States from Nigeria after fleeing the Biafran War, a conflict blamed for about 100,000 military casualties and as many as two million starvation deaths in the late 1960s.

That history — and her family’s own challenges adjusting to American life as immigrants — has formed a career that included working as an asylum officer, serving the children of migrant farmworkers as an Americorps volunteer and becoming an immigration attorney for the refugee-focused Church World Service. Ozobia is now settling in to her latest role on that trajectory — directing Nevada’s Office for New Americans.

Amaka Ozobia esta sentada en una sala de conferencias.
Daniel Clark / The Nevada Independent

Read in English.

Los padres de Amaka Ozobia llegaron a los Estados Unidos de Nigeria después de vivir la Guerra de Biafra, conflicto que generó 100,000 bajas militares y 2 millones de muertos por hambruna a finales de los 60’s.

Malachi Brooks / Unsplash

Immigrants make up more than ten percent of the population in our region. And according to a report, that can provide big economic benefits.

An artistic portrayal of two trains meeting at the completion of the railroad as people cheer and celebrate.
Nevada Museum of Art

The late 1800s brought thousands of Chinese immigrants to the West in search of better lives. Many participated in the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad. For the 150th anniversary of that engineering feat, artists have memorialized the contributions of those often forgotten Chinese immigrants. KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Holly Hutchings about the exhibit.