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A group of 11 people, all wearing masks, pose together for a group photo.
Courtesy of Sonny Vinuya

About 3,800 hate incidents against people of Asian descent have been reported nationwide over the past year.

In Southern Nevada, Asian Americans are the fastest-growing racial or ethnic group, according to reporting by the Associated Press in 2019.

To understand how Nevada’s Asian community has fared over the last year, KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck sat down with Sonny Vinuya, president of the Las Vegas Asian Chamber of Commerce.

An image of the "Welcome to Las Vegas" sign from the roadway.
matze_ott / CC BY 2.0

Here are your local news headlines for the morning of Monday, Mar. 15, 2021.

A wide shot of a busy city at night. There are tall buildings in the foreground, many small dots of light in the middleground and dark blue mountains in the far background.
f11photo / Adobe Stock

Editor’s note: Since this story published, the Fremont Street Experience cancelled their New Year’s Eve event in a day-of decision on Dec. 31.

Downtown Las Vegas typically attracts tourists from all over the world for New Year’s Eve celebrations. Even though the pandemic has shut down most of the festivities this year, a scaled-back event could still draw thousands. Health officials decry the potential risks.

A man holds a sign that says, "Blue Lives Matter."
David Calvert / Nevada Independent

Lawmakers in Nevada are rolling back protections granted to law enforcement officers under investigation. The protections were just put into place last year. Law enforcement agencies and progressive groups both denounced the bill. 

A sign on the ground that says, "Ban Chokeholds," covered in spotted shade from a tree.
Ty C. O’Neil / This Is Reno / Nevada News

Black Lives Matter protests have erupted across the country, and in Nevada, and with them, demands for police reform. In response, lawmakers in Nevada have approved a bill meant to change how law enforcement officers in the state handle arrests, but activists say there’s more to be done.

A family portrait with a man and his two daughters, one to each of his sides. They are hugging and smiling.
Courtesy of Luisa Frias

The Mountain West News Bureau is talking to friends and relatives of those who lost their lives to COVID-19.

Luis Frias was an international dancer who took his two daughters wherever he performed on tour. His eldest, Luisa, remembers playing on the beach in Australia and watching packed stadiums from the Superdome in New Orleans to Madison Square Garden.

Man smiling on a crowded street
Courtesy of Ish Bermudez

Coverage of novel coronavirus is supported by the Mick Hitchcock, Ph.D., Project for Visualizing Science, a science reporting project from the Reynolds School of Journalism.

In early March, Nevadan make-up artist Ish Bermudez was touring with the show Chippendales Las Vegas across the country as a wardrobe manager. He began not feeling well while he was still on the road traveling in New York, Ohio and Indiana. He sought care at an urgent care facility, where he was given some pain medication, but a COVID-19 test wasn’t available.

A white sign that says, 'For Rent 1 Bedroom Suite,' in red letters. In the background is a blurry tree and building.
Kurt Bauschardt / Flickr Creative Commons

Despite Governor Steve Sisolak’s moratorium on evictions, some tenants in Nevada are reporting that they’re being harassed or bullied.

A pink building with the word office on top of it. In the background are motel rooms and a staircase.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Hundreds of thousands of Nevadans have lost their jobs due to nonessential business closures meant to limit the spread of COVID-19. To protect them from housing insecurity, Governor Steve Sisolak ordered a moratorium on evictions, but there’s confusion on who is protected. Both tenants and landlords for weekly motels are concerned about what the future holds.

El Strip de Las Vegas por la noche vacío frente al Caesars Palace Hotel y Casino.
Andrew Mendez / KUNR

Después del cierre de los negocios no esenciales en Nevada durante 30 días, muchos trabajadores de casinos se quedan sin trabajo. 

Darling Parelta trabajaba como un portera de casino en el Sahara Hotel y Casino ubicado en el famoso Strip de Las Vegas. 

Según el Associated Press, el cierre afecta a más de 200 mil empleados de casinos de Nevada. Parelta es una de ellas.

 

Ella dice que el cierre da miedo y que solo puede pensar en sus hijos.    

The Nevada Strip at night empty facing the Caesars Palace Hotel and Casino.
Andrew Mendez / KUNR

After the closure of Nevada’s non-essential businesses for 30 days, many casino workers are left without a job. 

Exterior del Ayuntamiento de la Ciudad de Las Vegas.
Jeff Scheid / The Nevada Independent

Read in English.

Las ciudades de Las Vegas, Henderson y Reno han confirmado en semanas recientes que continuarán aceptando y reinstalando a refugiados, luego de un anuncio del Gobernador Steve Sisolak de que Nevada accede a darles la bienvenida.

Exterior of Las Vegas City Hall.
Jeff Scheid / The Nevada Independent

Lee en español.

The cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and Reno have confirmed in recent weeks that they will continue to accept and resettle refugees, following an announcement made by Gov. Steve Sisolak that Nevada consents to welcoming refugees.

Yaneliz Mercado

This week marked the second anniversary of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. 58 people were murdered and hundreds more were injured while attending an outdoor music festival in Las Vegas. 

 Yaneliz Mercado is a senior at the University of Nevada, Reno now, but she lived in Vegas two years ago when her mother, Maria, was working at the festival. They both survived that night, but it took hours for them to be reunited. Listen to Yaneliz share their story.

 

Noah Glick

From ATMs to self-checkout lines, automation technology is everywhere. And there’s a growing fear that as technology advances it could eliminate millions of American jobs.

According to at least one report, our region is especially vulnerable, having three of the top five states most at risk. But some here are already taking steps to help soften the blow.

Tim Trad / Unsplash

In a mostly symbolic move, the U.S. House voted Thursday to stop the Trump administration from exiting the Paris Climate Agreement. Meanwhile, many cities and states in the Mountain West are continuing to warm faster than the national average.

 

Lightning In A Bottle...Or Tube

Apr 19, 2019
A huge, brightly lit neon sign of a horse and its rider stands tall on Fremont Street in Las Vegas.
Jakob Owens on Unsplash

The science of neon hasn't changed in over a century. What charged the gas to life as a 1900's advertising medium still burns it brightly today. For KUNR's detailed series on neon, Holly Hutchings traveled to our counterpart in the South and spoke with a physicist about what he calls, lightning in a bottle. 

Upsplash

As many of us are traveling in and around Nevada for the holidays, the American Society of Civil Engineers says roads in Las Vegas are improving, but much of the infrastructure in Northern Nevada is aging.

Cannabis Plant
Michelle Matus

Nevada could gather more than $1 billion from the marijuana industry by 2024, according to an industry group's recent economic analysis. KUNR contributor Kaleb Roedel of the Northern Nevada Business View has more. 

men shaking hands
Courtesy of University Archives, University of Nevada, Reno.

If you have the feeling that election season is getting longer and longer, you’re not wrong. Even on the state level, political candidates often announce their intentions at least a year before Election Day. In this installment of “Time & Place”, historian Alicia Barber takes us back to a time when running for office required much smaller investments of time—and money.

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