Latinx Community

UNLV Graduate Student Monserrath Hernandez speaks at a panel event celebrating the launch of a podcast highlighting the work of the Latinx Voices of Southern Nevada project.
UNLV University Libraries

The Latino and Hispanic population is the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. But many of their stories are left out of the historical record.

Across the country, a number of academic institutions are trying to change that, one oral history at a time. One of the latest is in Nevada.

A pull quote is used to describe the words Christopher Monzon used when describing his experience at UNR.
Andrew Mendez

KUNR's bilingual student reporter Andrew Mendez has been looking into the unique obstacles Latinx students may face when they enter college. Along with reporting on the hurdles, he's been researching potential solutions on the local level. He joined our news director Michelle Billman to share his findings.

A man in a white leather jacket and black curly hair is leaning back as he stands playing his guitar. The guitar is red and white and there is a red drum set behind him.
Photo Courtesy of Jess Kitchingman

 

Nearly one in five students at the University of Nevada, Reno identifies as Latinx. Latinx is a gender-neutral term for Latino. Often, these students are first generation or "first gen" college students and face a unique set of challenges when it comes to retainment and support. KUNR’s Andrew Mendez explores. 

 

 

 

 

A male student wearing shorts and short sleeve shirt walks out of the Nevada Living Learning Community residence hall. There is grass and strees in front of the brick building that has windows facing the grassy area.
Andrew Mendez

Editor’s note (9-27-19): Since this article was published, the University of Nevada, Reno has provided new language abour the Latinx dorm wing. According to UNR: “This living learning community is open to all qualified students with an interest in Latinx culture and history and/or identify as Latinx.” The audio and text for t

David Calvert

As the Reno Aces wrap up their season, KUNR’s Stephanie Serrano sat down with Emily Jaenson, the team’s general manager and the only female GM in Triple-A Baseball. In this conversation, Jaenson breaks down what it means to be a female leader and gives some highlights from this season.