LGBTQ+

People sit in a semicircle in a club-lit room as they sing.
Andrew Mendez / KUNR Public Radio

Coming into the 2020 Nevada Democratic caucus, many LGBTQ+ voters say they want to see presidential candidates who will speak out about the community's unique issues. 

It’s a Friday night and about 15 people chime in as Lizzo’s “Truth Hurts” comes on. They are at Our Center in Reno, the only LGBTQ+ community center for Northern Nevada, which is decorated with flashing colored lights for a regular event called "Queer Karaoke." 

A rainbow pride flag hangs over a doorway inside a coffee shop. People are chatting and one woman is holding a wine glass.
Lucia Starbuck

This year, there are several LGBTQ+ candidates running for office around Nevada. They say it’s time there’s more representation in local government.

Illustrated By Stephanie Serrano

For the LGBTQ+ community, marginalization is deterring some from accessing medical care. Nearly one in five avoid seeking care due to fear of discrimination, and studies show disparities can lead to poor health outcomes. For one gay man in Northern Nevada, navigating the health system has been a daunting experience. KUNR’s Anh Gray has his story.

As a warning, this story might not be suitable for all listeners as it discusses the topic of sexual assault.

A male student wearing shorts and short sleeve shirt walks out of the Nevada Living Learning Community residence hall. There is grass and strees in front of the brick building that has windows facing the grassy area.
Andrew Mendez

Editor’s note (9-27-19): Since this article was published, the University of Nevada, Reno has provided new language abour the Latinx dorm wing. According to UNR: “This living learning community is open to all qualified students with an interest in Latinx culture and history and/or identify as Latinx.” The audio and text for t

Mick Hicks

1983 was a tough year for Reno’s LGBTQ+ community.

The AIDS epidemic had reached Nevada. And the Gay Rodeo was facing a stronger threat of violence than in years past. An article from the Reno Evening Gazette said that anonymous telephone calls to Reno’s three main television stations warned that snipers were poised to shoot attendees.

Despite threats on multiple fronts, the event was one of the few times that being openly gay was generally accepted in the Biggest Little City.