Neon

Holly Hutchings

While neon once brought to mind retro advertising for seedy adult businesses and dive bars, it is now often seen as art. Holly Hutchings talks to one artist who has been making the colorful craft for decades.

Touring Reno's Neon

Apr 22, 2019
Krysta Scripter

The best way to experience neon is to step into the night air, get up close and let the light sink in. Reno MoMo, or Modern Movement, is hosting neon walking tours that let everyday people do just that. The group takes curious guests through back alleys and down busy roads to share the tales of the neon. Holly Hutchings joined them on a recent stroll and has this story.

A huge, brightly lit neon sign of a horse and its rider stands tall on Fremont Street in Las Vegas.
Jakob Owens on Unsplash

The science of neon hasn't changed in over a century. What charged the gas to life as a 1900's advertising medium still burns it brightly today. For KUNR's detailed series on neon, Holly Hutchings traveled to our counterpart in the South and spoke with a physicist about what he calls, lightning in a bottle. 

Sheila and Peter Laufer

As part of the "Sparked: Northern Nevada's Neon" series we are taking you on a visual road trip across rural Nevada to explore some of the states iconic neon signs. Images for this storymap were provided by Sheila and Peter Laufer, authors of Neon Nevada

Video: 38 Years Of Making Neon In Northern Nevada

Apr 4, 2019
A man stands in front of a work table, holding a small neon sign.
Krysta Scripter

Ken Hines has been working with neon for 38 years and describes himself as the last full-time neon tube-bender in Northern Nevada, making him an asset to the local sign industry. He won't be around forever though, and when KUNR first met him, he was looking for an apprentice. 

Since then, he's found one, and he expects to stay in business for another 10 or so years while also teaching his craft to the next generation.  KUNR took a look inside his studio at Artech to learn more.