nevada caucus

Nevada's Last Caucus?

Mar 12, 2020
Image of a sign that reads "caucus" with an arrow pointing into a gymnasium.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Caucus... you've probably heard that word a lot this year. For some, it's a time-honored tradition that allows communities to come together to select a political candidate that best represents them. For others, it’s an overly complicated and outdated way of voting. So now that the Nevada Caucuses are firmly behind us, KUNR's Paul Boger decided to take a look at the Silver State’s caucus system and how it may evolve ahead of the next presidential election.

The Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation is one of the largest in the state. But, some tribal members say they feel ignored by politicians locally and nationally.

Noah Glick visited Pyramid Lake High School for the caucus over the weekend. He met up with Norman Harry, the former chairman for the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe to discuss voter turnout and the 2020 Election more generally.

A panoramic photo. There are several rows of long tables with people sitting down and talking.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Presidential hopeful and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders came in first place in Nevada’s Democratic caucus over the weekend, but at least one precinct in Reno, Nevada had Spanish translation issues.

Man speaks to crowd of enthusiastic young people
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

Bernie Sanders was the 'belle of the ball' Saturday night, or rather, the 'belle of Nevada.' He easily took first place in the state's caucuses.

Image of a sign that reads "caucus" with an arrow pointing into a gymnasium.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada’s caucuses are now over and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was the declared winner, but what was the experience like for native voters? And what did they have to say?

A desert landscape with a road heading toward the horizon
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Though Nevada has a fair amount of cities, vast parts of the state are a sea of sagebrush, with very few towns. And as the Nevada State Democratic Party gears up for its caucuses on Saturday, Democrats in the state’s many rural counties are facing significant hurdles with the caucus system. 

Scott Youngs poses for a photo. He's sitting in a wheelchair. In the background there is a building with bricks and white walls.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Scott Youngs is the project director for ADA Nevada, which provides training for people with disabilities and helps organizations understand their responsibilities in regards to being compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck spoke with Youngs about what Nevada’s caucus can do to be more accessible for voters with disabilities, and about his own experience caucusing.

Photo of Culinary Workers Union Local 226 members at a podium.
Culinary Workers Union Local 226

Last night, six Democratic presidential candidates debated in Nevada, where health care reform became a contentious issue. KUNR's News Director Michelle Billman checked in with Health Reporter Anh Gray for the details.

An image of a sign that reads "Vote Here, Vote Aqui"
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Update 9:45 a.m. PST: According to the state Democratic Party, more than 70,000 Nevadans took part in the early caucus voting period from Saturday through Tuesday.

The first wave of Democratic voters are casting their ballots in Nevada’s early caucuses, and the process looks different than in years past.

Aiming to boost turnout, Nevada Democrats instituted a four-day early voting period for the first time this year. It appears to be working. According to the state Democratic Party, more than 36,000 Nevadans took part in early caucus voting over the long weekend, and more than half of Saturday’s 18,000 voters were first-time participants.

An image of Pete Buttigieg holding a microphone.
Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA 2.0

Democratic presidential hopefuls are making their last appeals to Nevada voters this week, ahead of Saturday’s caucuses. And former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg has held multiple events in northern Nevada this week.

A picture of Pete Buttigieg shaking hands with voters.
Noah Glick

Early voting is underway for Nevada's caucus, and candidates are making their way to Northern Nevada to stump. In the past week alone, our area has seen campaign visits from all, with the exception of former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg and U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard from Hawaii.

An image showing a sign that reads "Early Vote, 10-6" for people casting votes in northern Nevada.
Noah Glick

As Nevadans cast their early votes before Saturday’s presidential caucus, some say campaigns are missing out on one key voting bloc: tribes.

Trei Brundrett / Flickr/Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)/Edited

After the chaos of the Iowa caucuses, Democrats in the next caucus state of Nevada are anxious.

Person holds an Iowa presidential preference card.
Phil Roeder / Flickr / Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Iowa democrats were thrown for a loop in their caucus reporting on Monday, due to coding errors on their app.

Vote here sign in front of a caucus site.
Erik Hersman / Flickr, CC Attribution 2.0 Generic

We're days away from the Iowa Democratic Caucuses, and weeks away in Nevada. At the Nevada Democratic Party’s Reno office, about 25 volunteers are learning how to run a caucus event. On Feb. 22, they will show up at their precinct and help organize the votes.

Attendees sit as they listen to a presentation.
my learning / Flickr Creative Commons

The Nevada Democratic Party is hosting a series of interactive sessions where voters can get a better understanding of how to caucus.

Bree Zender

With a wide Democratic field, many presidential candidates are struggling to connect with voters ahead of the 2020 Nevada Caucuses. The race is saturated. 

Noah Glick

The first wave of Democratic voters will soon be making their choice for who they think should be the party’s presidential nominee. Nevada is the first state in the West to weigh in. It’s also the most diverse, making the Silver State more of a bellwether than other early voting states.

Bree Zender

Come this November, the general election will be just a year away. Looking ahead, KUNR's Paul Boger sat down with NPR National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea, who is in Reno this week, to break down what we can make of this process so far.

Mykl Roventine / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Nevada Democrats will have more options when participating in the state's first-in-the-West caucus next February. That's because party leaders are allowing people to vote early and by phone.

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