Nevada Caucus 2020

Nevada's Last Caucus?

Mar 12, 2020
Image of a sign that reads "caucus" with an arrow pointing into a gymnasium.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Caucus... you've probably heard that word a lot this year. For some, it's a time-honored tradition that allows communities to come together to select a political candidate that best represents them. For others, it’s an overly complicated and outdated way of voting. So now that the Nevada Caucuses are firmly behind us, KUNR's Paul Boger decided to take a look at the Silver State’s caucus system and how it may evolve ahead of the next presidential election.

Dora Uchel standing in front of the Jot Travis Building. Uchel is wearing a caucus observer button on her shirt that reads "Bernie For President 2020 Observer."
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Nevada’s caucus isn’t accessible for everyone. Many voters with disabilities said they have faced unique challenges when trying to participate in the election process, including caucusing. Nevada's Democratic caucus was on Saturday, February 22, and some voters voiced the obstacles they experienced. 

The Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation is one of the largest in the state. But, some tribal members say they feel ignored by politicians locally and nationally.

Noah Glick visited Pyramid Lake High School for the caucus over the weekend. He met up with Norman Harry, the former chairman for the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe to discuss voter turnout and the 2020 Election more generally.

A panoramic photo. There are several rows of long tables with people sitting down and talking.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Presidential hopeful and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders came in first place in Nevada’s Democratic caucus over the weekend, but at least one precinct in Reno, Nevada had Spanish translation issues.

Man speaks to crowd of enthusiastic young people
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

Bernie Sanders was the 'belle of the ball' Saturday night, or rather, the 'belle of Nevada.' He easily took first place in the state's caucuses.

Image of a sign that reads "caucus" with an arrow pointing into a gymnasium.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada’s caucuses are now over and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was the declared winner, but what was the experience like for native voters? And what did they have to say?

A desert landscape with a road heading toward the horizon
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Though Nevada has a fair amount of cities, vast parts of the state are a sea of sagebrush, with very few towns. And as the Nevada State Democratic Party gears up for its caucuses on Saturday, Democrats in the state’s many rural counties are facing significant hurdles with the caucus system. 

Scott Youngs poses for a photo. He's sitting in a wheelchair. In the background there is a building with bricks and white walls.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Scott Youngs is the project director for ADA Nevada, which provides training for people with disabilities and helps organizations understand their responsibilities in regards to being compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck spoke with Youngs about what Nevada’s caucus can do to be more accessible for voters with disabilities, and about his own experience caucusing.

Illustration of an assault style gun.
Illustrated by Stephanie Serrano / KUNR

Nevada is home to the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. As the caucus approaches, gun reform is one key issue that Democratic presidential candidates are addressing. KUNR’s Paul Boger sat down with Stephanie Serrano to break down what we know about their policies.

Photo of Culinary Workers Union Local 226 members at a podium.
Culinary Workers Union Local 226

Last night, six Democratic presidential candidates debated in Nevada, where health care reform became a contentious issue. KUNR's News Director Michelle Billman checked in with Health Reporter Anh Gray for the details.

Turkel said, "The Latinx community in this country has always kind of been treated as a second-class community. We would love to see our community addressed in a way that’s dignified and acknowledges us as American…"
Andrew Mendez / KUNR

Democratic hopefuls have made attempts to reach out to Spanish-speaking communities, but voters in Northern Nevada have said candidates are not doing enough to reach them before the caucus.

In the past few weeks, most of the candidates have boosted their efforts to reach Latinx voters, by dropping campaign ads in Spanish ahead of Nevada’s caucus.

An image of two Latino students sitting on couches chatting with each other.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

As Nevadans get ready to caucus this weekend, the nation should be paying attention. That’s because unlike Iowa and New Hampshire, where the first caucus and primary were held, respectively, Nevada’s population more closely mirrors the U.S. According to the U.S. Census, almost one-third of the state is Hispanic or Latino.

Una Guía: Cómo Participar En El Caucus De Nevada

Feb 19, 2020

Two pharmacists, one filling a prescription and the other holding paperwork.
Joint Base Lewis McChord / Flickr Creative Commons

Health care was a top issue for many voters in the Democratic primaries in Iowa and New Hampshire. As the Nevada caucus is quickly approaching, KUNR’s Anh Gray talked with John Packham, a state health policy expert, to break down how the national debate might shape issues of affordability and access in the state.

Bernie Sanders is outside at the University of Nevada, Reno with young people walking on both sides of him.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Vermont senator and presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders said he expects a repeat of his victory in New Hampshire here in Nevada.

An image of a sign that reads "Vote Here, Vote Aqui"
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Update 9:45 a.m. PST: According to the state Democratic Party, more than 70,000 Nevadans took part in the early caucus voting period from Saturday through Tuesday.

The first wave of Democratic voters are casting their ballots in Nevada’s early caucuses, and the process looks different than in years past.

Aiming to boost turnout, Nevada Democrats instituted a four-day early voting period for the first time this year. It appears to be working. According to the state Democratic Party, more than 36,000 Nevadans took part in early caucus voting over the long weekend, and more than half of Saturday’s 18,000 voters were first-time participants.

People sit in a semicircle in a club-lit room as they sing.
Andrew Mendez / KUNR Public Radio

Coming into the 2020 Nevada Democratic caucus, many LGBTQ+ voters say they want to see presidential candidates who will speak out about the community's unique issues. 

It’s a Friday night and about 15 people chime in as Lizzo’s “Truth Hurts” comes on. They are at Our Center in Reno, the only LGBTQ+ community center for Northern Nevada, which is decorated with flashing colored lights for a regular event called "Queer Karaoke." 

An image of Pete Buttigieg holding a microphone.
Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA 2.0

Democratic presidential hopefuls are making their last appeals to Nevada voters this week, ahead of Saturday’s caucuses. And former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg has held multiple events in northern Nevada this week.

A picture of Pete Buttigieg shaking hands with voters.
Noah Glick

Early voting is underway for Nevada's caucus, and candidates are making their way to Northern Nevada to stump. In the past week alone, our area has seen campaign visits from all, with the exception of former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg and U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard from Hawaii.

An image showing a sign that reads "Early Vote, 10-6" for people casting votes in northern Nevada.
Noah Glick

As Nevadans cast their early votes before Saturday’s presidential caucus, some say campaigns are missing out on one key voting bloc: tribes.

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