Nevada Caucus 2020

Image of a sign that reads "caucus" with an arrow pointing into a gymnasium.
Noah Glick / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada’s caucuses are now over and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders was the declared winner, but what was the experience like for native voters? And what did they have to say?

A desert landscape with a road heading toward the horizon
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Though Nevada has a fair amount of cities, vast parts of the state are a sea of sagebrush, with very few towns. And as the Nevada State Democratic Party gears up for its caucuses on Saturday, Democrats in the state’s many rural counties are facing significant hurdles with the caucus system. 

Scott Youngs poses for a photo. He's sitting in a wheelchair. In the background there is a building with bricks and white walls.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Scott Youngs is the project director for ADA Nevada, which provides training for people with disabilities and helps organizations understand their responsibilities in regards to being compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck spoke with Youngs about what Nevada’s caucus can do to be more accessible for voters with disabilities, and about his own experience caucusing.

The Democratic presidential primary is heading west for the third contest in the 2020 race. Nevada Democrats are hoping their caucuses avoid similar problems that plagued Iowa earlier this month.

Follow NPR's coverage for the latest updates, analysis and results as the caucuses get underway.

Photo of Culinary Workers Union Local 226 members at a podium.
Culinary Workers Union Local 226

Last night, six Democratic presidential candidates debated in Nevada, where health care reform became a contentious issue. KUNR's News Director Michelle Billman checked in with Health Reporter Anh Gray for the details.

Turkel said, "The Latinx community in this country has always kind of been treated as a second-class community. We would love to see our community addressed in a way that’s dignified and acknowledges us as American…"
Andrew Mendez / KUNR

Democratic hopefuls have made attempts to reach out to Spanish-speaking communities, but voters in Northern Nevada have said candidates are not doing enough to reach them before the caucus.

In the past few weeks, most of the candidates have boosted their efforts to reach Latinx voters, by dropping campaign ads in Spanish ahead of Nevada’s caucus.

Una Guía: Cómo Participar En El Caucus De Nevada

Feb 19, 2020

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It's showtime in Las Vegas. Democratic presidential candidates are debating for the ninth time for the 2020 campaign, but it's former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg's first time on stage.

Two pharmacists, one filling a prescription and the other holding paperwork.
Joint Base Lewis McChord / Flickr Creative Commons

Health care was a top issue for many voters in the Democratic primaries in Iowa and New Hampshire. As the Nevada caucus is quickly approaching, KUNR’s Anh Gray talked with John Packham, a state health policy expert, to break down how the national debate might shape issues of affordability and access in the state.

Bernie Sanders is outside at the University of Nevada, Reno with young people walking on both sides of him.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

Vermont senator and presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders said he expects a repeat of his victory in New Hampshire here in Nevada.

An image of a sign that reads "Vote Here, Vote Aqui"
Bree Zender / KUNR Public Radio

Update 9:45 a.m. PST: According to the state Democratic Party, more than 70,000 Nevadans took part in the early caucus voting period from Saturday through Tuesday.

The first wave of Democratic voters are casting their ballots in Nevada’s early caucuses, and the process looks different than in years past.

Aiming to boost turnout, Nevada Democrats instituted a four-day early voting period for the first time this year. It appears to be working. According to the state Democratic Party, more than 36,000 Nevadans took part in early caucus voting over the long weekend, and more than half of Saturday’s 18,000 voters were first-time participants.

VIDEO: ¿Cómo Funciona El Caucus?

Feb 19, 2020
Personas en un evento de campaña de la presidencia.
Daniel Clark / The Nevada Independent

El Día del Caucus Demócrata en Nevada tendrá lugar el sábado 22 de febrero y los participantes podrán votar en persona.

People sit in a semicircle in a club-lit room as they sing.
Andrew Mendez / KUNR Public Radio

Coming into the 2020 Nevada Democratic caucus, many LGBTQ+ voters say they want to see presidential candidates who will speak out about the community's unique issues. 

It’s a Friday night and about 15 people chime in as Lizzo’s “Truth Hurts” comes on. They are at Our Center in Reno, the only LGBTQ+ community center for Northern Nevada, which is decorated with flashing colored lights for a regular event called "Queer Karaoke." 

An image of Pete Buttigieg holding a microphone.
Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA 2.0

Democratic presidential hopefuls are making their last appeals to Nevada voters this week, ahead of Saturday’s caucuses. And former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg has held multiple events in northern Nevada this week.

A picture of Pete Buttigieg shaking hands with voters.
Noah Glick

Early voting is underway for Nevada's caucus, and candidates are making their way to Northern Nevada to stump. In the past week alone, our area has seen campaign visits from all, with the exception of former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg and U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard from Hawaii.

An image showing a sign that reads "Early Vote, 10-6" for people casting votes in northern Nevada.
Noah Glick

As Nevadans cast their early votes before Saturday’s presidential caucus, some say campaigns are missing out on one key voting bloc: tribes.

People waiting in line.
Jayden Perez / KUNR

Many Democrats in Nevada waited in long lines over the weekend in order to participate in early voting for the presidential caucus.

Trei Brundrett / Flickr/Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)/Edited

After the chaos of the Iowa caucuses, Democrats in the next caucus state of Nevada are anxious.

Illustrated by Stephanie Serrano

The Nevada State Democratic Party has announced the digital tool it will be using to count its caucus results. 

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