Nevada Department of Education

What's Nevada's Turnaround Grant?

Sep 23, 2016
Alexa Ard

The Turnaround Grant is now in its second year, providing low-ranking Nevada schools with millions of dollars to help improve their performance. Reno Public Radio's Sarah Parks explores how the program works.

Desert Heights, Grace Warner, and Sun Valley Elementary Schools are just a few of the 39 institutions in Nevada awarded with the Turnaround Grant. 

Alexa Ard

More than 200 social workers are being placed in schools throughout Nevada this academic year. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

The Nevada Department of Education’s Office of Safe and Respectful Learning Environments, established during last year’s legislative session, is funding the addition of two-hundred-nine-point-five school social workers.

U.S. Dept of Agriculture, Flickr (CC by 2.0)

The Nevada Department of Education has announced federal funds to help students experiencing homelessness. 

"In Nevada last year there were 17,172 students identified as homeless," says Mike Walker, state coordinator for homeless education. 

And, he says, that number has been increasing substantially over the last four to five years. That's where an annual grant from the Department of Education comes in.

Kenwyn Derby / Twitter

More than 200 educators from across the state met in Reno recently to discuss updating their curriculums to help kids overcome the effects of trauma. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick has more.

Victoria Blakeney is with the new state Office of Safe and Respectful Learning Environments, and was one of more than a dozen presenters. She says that Nevada kids are experiencing trauma at higher rates than the national average.

“Our data shows that kids, more than half, are coming from at least one ACE.”

Alexa Ard

A new law went into effect this month that now requires every school district in Nevada to provide performance-based bonuses to some of its teachers and administrators. Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports.

Steve Canavero is interim superintendent of public instruction, and he says the main goal of this new law is to find and reward the right people.

A Nevada audit recently revealed that the department of education takes too much time to revoke the licenses of teachers who’ve been arrested for a variety of offenses, including sex crimes.  The average wait time is more than a year.

The audit examined 13 cases last year in which a person holding a Nevada education license was arrested for a crime, after which the state took up to 1,200 days to revoke their license.