Nevada history

An old picture of Morrill Hall, the first building on the UNR campus.
Courtesy of University Archives / University of Nevada, Reno Libraries

Classes are underway at the University of Nevada in Reno. And in this segment of “Time & Place,” historian Alicia Barber tells the story of how, why and where it all began. 

Dick Belaustegui (back row, second from right) poses with his class in front of the Orvis Ring School in northeast Reno, late 1940s.
Courtesy of Dick Belaustegui.

It may not feel like fall out there yet, but for students throughout our region, summer vacation is over and school is back in session. In this episode of “Time & Place,” historian Alicia Barber takes a look back at the development of Reno’s public schools and some of the neighborhoods they served.

Courtesy California State University, Chico, Meriam Library Special Collections

Summertime in Northern Nevada can really bring the heat. Fortunately, for most of us, cooling down is as easy as heading to the refrigerator. But it wasn’t always so easy for our region’s residents to chill out in the hot weather, as historian Alicia Barber explains in this episode of “Time & Place.”

Picture Collage of Mid-Century Motels
Courtesy UNR Special Collections, Jerry Stefani, and Mike Roberts

Reno is home to a collection of quirky, mid-century motels. Some have fallen into disrepair, some serve as low-income housing and some are being torn down for new developments. But if you were to drive through Reno during the middle of the 20th century, you would have seen a booming motel landscape, when motels were icons of the vibrant tourism industry.

Pappy Smith at the Harolds Club.
Courtesy Special Collections, UNR Libraries.

Today, casinos are run by corporations that operate under a set of industry-wide standards and practices, but in the early days of Nevada gaming, the way a casino operated could tell you a lot about its owners. Historian Alicia Barber describes one notable example in this episode of Time & Place.

Mexican workers in Bracero Program
Courtesy of Neal Cobb.

As neighboring countries, the United States and Mexico have a long history of bilateral agreements. In this installment of “Time & Place,” historian Alicia Barber looks at one cooperative program introduced during World War II to benefit residents on both sides of the border.

Johnson-Jeffries fight
Photo courtesy of Neal Cobb.

Perhaps the most famous event in the history of Reno, Nevada took place on July 4, 1910. As we close out Black History Month, that momentous day is the focus of this segment of Time & Place from historian Alicia Barber.

Workers pick up rocks near Fallon, Nevada.
Courtesy of Armando DeCarlo.

In the 1930's, the effects of the Great Depression reached nearly every community in the United States. In this segment of Time & Place, Historian Alicia Barber describes one federal relief program that helped rebuild Nevada while putting thousands of Americans back on their feet.

Stewart Indian School Cultural Center, Museum On The Way

Jul 13, 2018
A man stands at a podium under a large white tent raising his hat and bowing his head with a group of people behind him also bowing their heads
Holly Hutchings

The Stewart Indian School in Carson City opened in 1890. Like similar schools across the country, the original goal was to assimilate Native American children and eliminate their culture and traditions. It closed its doors 90 years later in 1980. On Wednesday, alumni, tribal leaders and government officials gathered for a blessing ceremony for the future Stewart Indian School Cultural Center and Museum, which will open next year. Our reporter Holly Hutchings has the story.

All throughout Nevada, historic markers provide important information of particular places in the state. But often times they’ve been historically inaccurate and riddled with insensitive language or grammar mistakes. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports a project to correct those signs has just wrapped up.

There are about 260 historic markers throughout Nevada and they were originally installed in the 1960s. About half needed replacement.