NevadaCannabis

Cannabis plants under green light.
Vera Samburova/DRI

The same chemicals that give cannabis its distinct smell may be contributing to air pollution and affecting human health. Recent tests of four cannabis grow facilities in Nevada and California found that the plants naturally release compounds that, when they accumulate in the air, create smog.

Noah Glick

Recreational marijuana sales officially kicked off July 1 in Nevada. But what exactly does a retail cannabis brand look like?

Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick explores that question.

Marijuana has been used medicinally for thousands of years, but since about 1900, the plant has been politicized and vilified to the point that current decisions about it are still being impacted by decisions made a century ago. Our contributor Bob Conrad of ThisisReno takes a historic look back at the drug and the controversy surrounding it. 

 

Anh Gray

Nearly twenty-eight thousand Nevadans are currently cardholders in the state’s medical marijuana program. And about 3,500 are registered as home growers. Contrary to what some might think, weed isn’t that easy to grow. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores some issues patients encounter while cultivating at home.

For some medical marijuana cardholders in Nevada, it’s legal to grow their own cannabis. For example, it’s permitted if the strain a patient needs isn’t available or if they live 25 miles or more from a dispensary. One northern Nevada resident takes Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray on a tour of her greenhouse.

Michelle Matus

By legalizing recreational marijuana, Nevada voters have opened up the door for new businesses eager to serve this growing market.

But as Reno Public Radio’s Noah Glick reports, getting into the retail cannabis game comes at a high cost.

Martin Alonso/Creative Commons

Nevadans will soon be able to purchase recreational marijuana legally in Nevada. This poses a dramatic shift in the relationship between cannabis and law enforcement. For decades, simply possessing the drug was a felony across the Silver State. But with recent changes, how will police enforce the laws now?