nuclear waste

U.S. Department of Energy

Waste from the nation's worst nuclear accident could remain in our region for another 20 years.

In 1979, a nuclear reactor had a partial meltdown at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station in Pennsylvania. And the waste from that incident has been living in Idaho since the 1980s.

Dan Meyers / Unsplash

Lawmakers in our region are meeting Thursday to discuss the potential economic windfalls from nuclear waste storage. It's the first meeting of Wyoming's Spent Fuel Rods Subcommittee, which was created earlier this year.

Nathaniel Foong / Unsplash

Environmental activists are calling for a united voice in protesting the Department of Energy's recent shipment of nuclear waste through our region.

Earlier this month, the Department of Energy sent a shipment of nuclear waste from Tennessee to southern Nevada. The shipment was incorrectly labeled as low-level waste, but it was actually mixed with waste that needs treatment before disposal. Nevada officials accused the agency of trying to sneak the material into the state illegally.

Department of Energy

It's been more than thirty years since Yucca Mountain in Nevada was picked as the nation's nuclear waste site, and the state has been fighting the project ever since. Under President Obama, it got its wish.

Fast forward to the Trump administration, and that long-running debate is back on the table.

UNR Engineers Embark On Ambitious Seismic Study

Jul 15, 2015
University of Nevada, Reno

The Department of Energy has awarded a nearly $5 million grant to the University of Nevada, Reno to study the seismic safety of nuclear facilities. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey reports.

The money will allow UNR researchers to focus on the way that soil below a nuclear facility changes the building’s behavior during an earthquake.  

Ian Buckle directs UNR’s Structural Engineering Lab. In the past, he says, most engineers have ignored this effect because it has been too difficult to quantify. But understanding it is critical to designing more secure facilities. 

Democratic Senator Harry Reid says the designation of a sprawling national monument in rural Nevada last week was not part of an effort to fend off a nuclear waste dump. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss reports.

In an interview Monday with KNPR in Las Vegas, the outgoing senator was asked whether the designation of the Basin and Range National Monument was meant to prevent the construction of a railroad that would ship nuclear waste to the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository.