Online Learning

Starting Monday, Advanced Placement exams, which test high schoolers' knowledge of college material, will take an unusual form. The high-anxiety, college credit tests normally last three hours and are taken in person. But this year, in response to disruptions from the coronavirus outbreak, the College Board, which administers AP exams, shortened the tests to 45 minutes and moved them online.

Front exterior of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center at the University of Nevada, Reno.
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR

There are 21,000 students enrolled at the University of Nevada, Reno, and all of their courses have been moved online. This transition to online coursework has resulted in some growing pains. KUNR’s Jayden Perez checked in with students and professors at UNR, to gauge their reactions to the changes at the university.

Woman types on computer.
Evolution Labs / Flickr/Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

In response to the spread of coronavirus, schools across the nation, including the University of Nevada, Reno, are transitioning to online learning for a period of time. This adjustment can be a challenge for some students; particularly those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).