Politics and Policy

Blue and black pull quote saying "We don’t just look for 2020. We have issues that have been here for hundreds and hundreds of years."
Andrew Mendez / KUNR

The University of Nevada, Las Vegas recently hosted the 2020 Native American Presidential Forum where some Democratic hopefuls addressed indigenous communities and their concerns. 

Four presidential hopefuls participated, including Pete Buttigieg, Elizabeth Warren, Tom Steyer and Tulsi Gabbard.  Steyer appeared in person while the others sent in prerecorded messages or appeared on video chat.

Representatives from various tribes across the country asked the candidates questions on topics ranging from climate change to economic development for Native communities. 

Attendees sit as they listen to a presentation.
my learning / Flickr Creative Commons

The Nevada Democratic Party is hosting a series of interactive sessions where voters can get a better understanding of how to caucus.

Exterior of the CoreCivic's Houston Processing Center.
Patrick Feller / Flickr Creative Commons

Lee en español.

Nevada’s Democratic senators are calling for an investigation into a privately run ICE detention center in Pahrump after reports that an employee was active on a neo-Nazi website and wanted to start a white supremacist group.

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

Congress is taking additional steps to prepare for the upcoming Senate impeachment trial. The newly appointed House impeachment managers, who will present the case for impeachment, are reading the articles in the Senate chamber. Senators are also being sworn in as jurors.

Two silhouettes facing each other with podiums in front of them.
Angela Hsieh / NPR

Six Democratic presidential candidates are debating in Iowa on Tuesday, less than three weeks from the caucuses there. NPR reporters are providing background and analysis of the candidates' remarks in real-time.

Exterior of Las Vegas City Hall.
Jeff Scheid / The Nevada Independent

Lee en español.

The cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and Reno have confirmed in recent weeks that they will continue to accept and resettle refugees, following an announcement made by Gov. Steve Sisolak that Nevada consents to welcoming refugees.

Amaka Ozobia sitting in a conference room.
Daniel Clark / The Nevada Independent

Lee en español.

Amaka Ozobia’s parents came to the United States from Nigeria after fleeing the Biafran War, a conflict blamed for about 100,000 military casualties and as many as two million starvation deaths in the late 1960s.

That history — and her family’s own challenges adjusting to American life as immigrants — has formed a career that included working as an asylum officer, serving the children of migrant farmworkers as an Americorps volunteer and becoming an immigration attorney for the refugee-focused Church World Service. Ozobia is now settling in to her latest role on that trajectory — directing Nevada’s Office for New Americans.

Many ranchers are applauding President Donald Trump after he announced an overhaul of the nation’s bedrock environmental law on Thursday. 

A man prunes a marijuana plant at a cannabis growing center.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Nevada has brought in close to $200 million from recreational cannabis sales over the last three years. While it may seem the industry has become more mainstream across the state, there are still questions about its future. KUNR's Paul Boger spoke to The Nevada Independent's Michelle Rindels, who recently wrote a series diving into the state's legal weed market.

National Public Radio

President Trump is speaking to the nation following attacks on military bases in Iraq where U.S. troops are stationed.

A new study casts doubt on the safety of state abortion laws in the Mountain West.

Colorado and Utah are two of just six states nationwide that have laws allowing political campaign funds to be used for childcare expenses. But that number’s likely to climb, potentially freeing up more parents to run for office.

Phoenix Legg interviewing West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin.
phoenixrisinginamerica.com

At a rally last November in Las Vegas, a reporter noted Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet’s experience leading Denver Public Schools, and asked the presidential candidate, “With your experience in the education area, [how] would you use that experience as president to help the education system?”

It’s an unremarkable question—except for the fact that it was posed by a 12-year-old.

Since the 1960s, the National Park Service has partnered with nonprofit organizations to provide environmental education services to the public. But a recent audit from the U.S. Interior Department’s Office of the Inspector General found that some of these Residential Environmental Learning Centers have strayed from their original mission .

A vacant lot with a church in the background.
Lucia Starbuck

A 20-story hotel might be built in downtown Reno along the Truckee River. But a building this tall would produce a giant shadow. That has people of different interests worried. ThisisReno’s Bob Conrad spoke with Lucia Starbuck about the city’s decision on the hotel proposal.

Bree Zender

With a wide Democratic field, many presidential candidates are struggling to connect with voters ahead of the 2020 Nevada Caucuses. The race is saturated. 

Former HUD Sec. Julian Castro meets with voters  during a campaign stop in Minden.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

Democratic Presidential hopeful Julian Castro recently made headlines when he criticized Iowa and New Hampshire's position as the first two nominating states for their lack of diversity.

A crowd lines up outside the Western Folklife Center in Elko to hear from former Vice President Joe Biden.
Paul Boger / KUNR Public Radio

As many as 15 Democrats could be up for consideration during Nevada's Democratic Caucus in February. With such a crowded presidential field, campaigns are working to drum up every vote by spending more time in rural counties. KUNR's Paul Boger reports.

People hold signs with one letter each spelling impeach.
Lucia Starbuck

Attendees of a pro-impeachment rally say they’re optimistic that President Donald Trump will be removed from office, either through congressional action or by the voters next year. KUNR’s Lucia Starbuck has the story.

Noah Glick

The first wave of Democratic voters will soon be making their choice for who they think should be the party’s presidential nominee. Nevada is the first state in the West to weigh in. It’s also the most diverse, making the Silver State more of a bellwether than other early voting states.

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