Protest

Two women hold signs that say, “It’s time to use our outside voices children are not guinea pigs!” and, “Keep our educators off ventilators.”
Lucia Starbuck / KUNR Public Radio

Public schools in Washoe County are slated to reopen on August 17. In response, many teachers protested outside of the health district and school district buildings yesterday. They want the return to the physical classroom to be postponed, and they’re asking for increased safety measures when schools reopen. 

Protests against racism and police brutality continue in Colorado, but there are many faces and voices that are missing. Here, four Colorado women who are Black activists and scholars share their thoughts on what this moment means to them. They’ve opted out of protests, due to health complications or because they’re participating in other ways. Scroll down for their full bios. 


Protesting racism and police brutality is nothing new. But large, sustained turnouts, especially in small, mostly white towns, is something we've not seen before. For many of these protesters, it's their first time demonstrating - ever.

This story was powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative.

There's growing concern about violence at anti-racism protests after an armed man shot a protester at a demonstration on Monday in Albuquerque, with a number of activists across the Mountain West saying they have been harassed.

At a hearing last weekend about a Colorado bill on vaccination, Dr. Reginald Washington had originally planned to make several urgent points in support of the bill. 

First, that diseases like measles are resurging, and they’re serious. (He’d know. He’s treated patients with complications from measles and pertussis.) Second, due to COVID-19, children are missing well-child visits and skipping vaccinations, putting them at risk of outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. 

This story was powered by America Amplified, a public radio initiative.

Justin and his buddies look like they're from a special ops team – they're wearing flak jackets and carrying assault weapons. But they aren't military and they aren't police. 

"I see myself as a concerned citizen who happens to be armed," he says.

 


The Reno Police Department's use of force policy was updated on June 5 to include a warning before using deadly force is required when reasonable, and officers are required to intervene in excessive force situations.
Courtesy of the Reno Police Department

The Reno Police Department, or RPD, has announced some changes to its use of force policy in response to community input. The changes are in light of protests against police brutality, both locally and nationally, following the death of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis who was killed while in police custody after a white officer pressed his knee into Floyd's neck for several minutes, even after Floyd stopped moving and pleading for air.

An image of a protestor waving an upside-down American flag.
Chase Stevens / Las Vegas Review-Journal

Three Nevadans face terrorism-related charges after allegedly plotting to incite violence at recent protests in Las Vegas over the death of George Floyd, a black man who was killed while in police custody.

Law enforcement standing by on Virginia Street. Rioters running in different directions as tear gas fills the street.
Ty O'Neil / This Is Reno

As a warning, this story includes graphic images and videos containing violence that may be disturbing, along with inappropriate language.

Organizers of the Black Lives Matter protest on Saturday afternoon in Reno have denounced the violence that took place later that evening after the peaceful protest had ended. 

Lucia Starbuck was on the scene reporting for This Is Reno, and witnessed the events that unfolded at City Hall. She recounted what she saw with KUNR’s Anh Gray.

Weekend protests drew crowds across the country including in the Mountain West, from hundreds in Boise and Reno to thousands in Denver. Some city leaders now worry such gatherings could lead to new outbreaks of COVID-19.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock announced Sunday that the city will be offering free tests to demonstrators. 

Updated at 11:46 a.m. ET

Former Vice President Joe Biden condemned both police violence and President Trump's increasingly confrontational response to widespread unrest in a Tuesday morning speech delivered at Philadelphia City Hall.

Updated at 9:31 p.m. ET

Escalating his rhetoric during a period of roiling national crises, President Trump on Monday threatened to deploy the U.S. military to cities or states that don't take "necessary" actions to halt violent protests, saying the armed forces will "quickly solve the problem for them."

Trump's Rose Garden remarks came as just across the street, law enforcement officers deployed tear gas and shot rubber bullets to forcefully disperse peaceful protesters. Washington, D.C., had set a curfew Monday of 7 p.m. ET.

There's a woman in the forefront. In the background there's a crowd of people. Some are holding American flags.
Lucia Starbuck / This Is Reno

Across the country, groups have taken to the streets in recent weeks protesting so-called “stay-at-home” orders meant to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. They argue the measures that are supposed to keep people safe are actually doing more harm to the economy. KUNR’s Paul Boger spoke with Lucia Starbuck who’s covered the local protests for our media partner This Is Reno.

Manifestantes sientan en el medio de la calle.
Karina Gonzalez

Read and listen in Spanish here 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions visited Reno Monday morning to speak at a conference for the National Association of School Resource Officers at the Peppermill Resort. Roughly 200 people gathered outside to protest Sessions and President Donald Trump’s immigration policies. Reno Public Radio’s Karina Gonzalez has the story.

Paul Boger

Just one day after President Donald Trump's inauguration, thousands of demonstrators from Northern Nevada and Eastern California took to the streets of Reno calling for solidarity against the new administration. As Reno Public Radio's Paul Boger reports, protestors say they will fight for equal rights, income equality and the environment. 

 

Marching down Virginia Street, peaceful protestors held signs with messages like "love trumps hate," "my body, my choice" and "women's rights are human rights."

Photos: Black Lives Matter March In Downtown Reno

Jul 16, 2016
Marcus Lavergne/Reno Public Radio

Protestors at a Black Lives Matter march that took place Friday evening filled downtown Reno's public pavilion in a show of solidarity. The steel-lettered, iconic Believe statue standing in the background became the perfect centerpiece as an electrified crowd surrounded it. As speakers delivered powerful speeches and the group chanted in unison, passersby couldn't help but turn their heads to take a look at the spectacle.