racism

Sirens atop law enforcement vehicle
Aaron Anderer / Flickr Creative Commons

As thousands are demonstrating against a pattern of police brutality toward Black people in the U.S., Congress is working to find legislative solutions to reform law enforcement.

Catherine Cortez Masto is one of the Democratic senators from Nevada and the former state attorney general. She spoke with KUNR’s Bree Zender on Wednesday about what can be done on the federal level.

A mother smiling at the camera next to her two young children, a boy and a girl.
Courtesy of Cari Croghan

Dorothy Croghan is an 82-year-old retired teacher, mother and Reno resident. She attended a recent peace vigil in Reno held by Black Lives Matter organizers protesting police brutality. In this audio postcard, she shares her memories growing up as a Black woman in the United States. Her story begins in North Carolina.

Editor's Note: This story contains racial slurs.

Cities and counties across the country are declaring that racism is a public health crisis, including at least one city in the Mountain West.

Noah Glick

The University of Nevada, Reno community came together Wednesday to address the actions taken by a UNR student during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia earlier this month.

But many faculty and students are frustrated at what they say is a lack of action by the school’s administration to fight racism and bigotry on campus.

Paul Boger

Residents living in and around the Truckee Meadows gathered in Downtown Reno Monday night as part of a vigil to honor the victims of last weekend’s violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

But as Reno Public Radio’s Paul Boger reports, the remembrance was something akin to a rally against white-nationalists.

unlvrebels.com

The student newspaper for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas says it will change its name by next spring amid claims that the school's "Rebel" moniker is racist since it refers to Confederate soldiers.

Unitarian Universalist Association

  The pastor of a Reno church says he will continue to display the racial justice banner “Black Lives Matter” despite repeated acts of vandalism. Reno Public Radio’s Julia Ritchey reports.

The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship first put up its banner in August, spurred by the national dialogue and media coverage of high-profile police shootings of African-Americans.

A day later, the sign had been spray painted over to read “White Lives Matter,” and that was only the first incident.