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reno gazette-journal

Here are the local news headlines for the morning of Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021.

An image of UNR President Brian Sandoval wearing a mask while standing outside with other faculty members.
Courtesy / University of Nevada, Reno

Here are the local news headlines for the morning of Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021.

Courtesy Special Collections, University of Nevada Reno Libraries.

Our media landscape is constantly changing with the introduction of new technologies and formats, but it all began with words printed on a page. Historian Alicia Barber traces the evolution of Reno’s daily newspapers in this installment of Time & Place.

Washoe County Sheriff's Office

Washoe County is facing a wrongful death lawsuit from the family of a man who died during a struggle with deputies at the county jail. The suit comes just after the Reno Gazette-Journal reported an investigative series on a spike in deaths at the jail. Let's turn to our News Director Michelle Billman and Bob Conrad of ThisisReno to learn more.

Alexa Ard

Local lawyer Victor Salcido is running for the Reno City Council Ward 1 seat. Lately, he's been putting out a lot of negatives ads about his opponent, incumbent Jenny Brekhus. But after doing some fact-checking, Anjeanette Damon with the Reno Gazette-Journal has found that some of Salcido's ads are not entirely accurate. To learn more, our News Director Michelle Billman spoke with Damon. 

Tim Lenard

Reno is one of 47 sites nationwide now designated for refugee resettlement, so the Reno Gazette-Journal hosted a town hall to delve into that process. Our contributor Tim Lenard reports.

 

Retired Brigadier General Pamela Milligan sponsored the Kubuya family from the Democratic Republic of Congo. She even hosted them for a week when their apartment wasn’t ready. 

Julia Ritchey

Pot shops, a juice bar and some affordable housing in a formerly abandoned mall parking lot. Those are just a few of the new business projects coming to downtown Reno. Our reporter Julia Ritchey caught up with the Reno Gazette-Journal's city life reporter Mike Higdon for the latest developments. Below are excerpts of their conversation.

  Highlights

Ralstonreports.com

Longtime Nevada political reporter Jon Ralston published an essay this week called The Child I Love that shares the intimate story of raising his transgender son. Born as Maddy two decades ago, Ralston's child is transitioning from female to male and now goes by Jake. 

Our News Director Michelle Billman spoke with Ralston about the story, which appeared in his regular Ralston Reports column in the Reno Gazette-Journal, to learn what the response has been like so far.

Reno Fire Department

The Reno Gazette-Journal recently reported that there’s been a surge in overtime pay at the Reno Fire Department. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores why.

So far this year, the department has spent 50 percent more on overtime than it did during the first half of last year.

Funding cuts a few years ago caused the lay-offs of more than thirty firefighters. Chief Dave Chochran says firefighters on staff are working more due to the personnel shortage.

Julia Ritchey

Candidate filing ends Friday for state and local races. To fill us in on who's stepping into the political ring this season, Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey sat down with political reporter Seth Richardson from the Reno-Gazette Journal.

All eyes are on the U.S. Senate race where 16 candidates have filed. But the two presumptive nominees are, on the Democratic side, former Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto, and for the Republicans, Rep. Joe Heck.  

Courtesy Ray Hagar

  Four long-time journalists with the Reno-Gazette Journal retired at the end of last month, including political reporter Ray Hagar. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey sat down with Hagar to talk about his nearly four-decade career in journalism and an infamous episode when he accidentally became the news.

“My first job at the paper was in high school, and I answered the phones in the sports department at night when they got busy and when somebody called something in that the regular sports writers were too busy to deal with,” he says.