Renown Health

A picture of DNA.
Max Pixel, licensed for public domain use

About 35,000 Nevadans have already received no-cost genetic testing through the Healthy Nevada Project. KUNR’s Anh Gray reports researchers have new findings to share.

A man sitting in front of a microphone in a radio station.
Anh Gray

The leading cause of death in Nevada is heart disease. Some medical facilities around the country, including Renown Health in Reno, are incorporating whole food, plant-based nutrition in their treatment plans. To learn more about the science behind this way of eating, KUNR's Anh Gray sat down with Dr. Michael Greger. He’s the author of the bestselling book How Not To Die and a leading expert on how nutrition can prevent premature death.

bowl of fresh vegetables
Anna Pelzer via Unsplash

In the U.S., one person suffers a heart attack every 40 seconds. That’s according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And as KUNR Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports Renown Health is offering a rehab program by helping patients incorporate a plant-based diet.

BestMedicine by Renown Health

Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. To understand heart health, Reno-based cardiologist Dr. Chris Rowan has studied a group of people in South America and also examined the CT scans of ancient mummies. He spoke with our reporter Anh Gray.

Dr. Chris Rowan is with the Renown Institute for Heart and Vascular Health. He says that while diet and exercise can play a role in cardiovascular health, there are other factors that can contribute to heart disease.

Helix

Since 2016, Renown Health and the Desert Research Institute, or DRI, have been studying data from the genetic testing of 10,000 Northern Nevadans, as part of their Healthy Nevada Project. The goal is to learn more about health factors and risks for people across the region.

Over the next year or so, the project is going to grow significantly, as another 40,000 new participants are tested. Our News Director Michelle Billman spoke to Dr. Tony Slonim, the president of Renown Health, about the expansion.

Healing With Music Therapy

Dec 18, 2016
Anh Gray

A couple of times a week, music therapy is offered to patients in the pediatric unit at Renown Health. It’s a clinical intervention providing a therapeutic benefit. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray visits the hospital to learn more.

Doctors. Medical exams. IVs.  A hospital can be an unpleasant place for sick children. That’s why the Renown pediatric unit offers music therapy to help reduce pain and anxiety.

Renown Health

Nevada will soon be home to a large-scale public health study focusing on personal genetic information. It's a combined-effort by Renown Health, the Desert Research Institute, and a genetic-testing company called 23andMe.

REMSA

 

The number of emergency-room visits are climbing across the country and is linked to long wait times and higher mortality rates. 

 

Renown Health and Washoe’s ambulance provider the Regional Emergency Medical Services Authority, or REMSA, are forming an alliance to cut down on the unnecessary use of the healthcare system with the Community Health Programs. Renown Health will provide REMSA with funding to continue community-focused health services including the Nurse Health Line, Community Paramedicine, and Ambulance Transport Alternatives.

Low-Income Seniors, Kids Receive Free Shots

Sep 9, 2016
Sarah Parks

A special partnership is now providing free immunizations and other health related aid to children and seniors in Reno who are in need. Reno Public Radio's Sarah Parks reports.

Renown Health is providing Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada with a grant that covers all expenses of the vaccinations, which according to Wendy Damonte, can otherwise come with a hefty fee.

"If you go out to a pharmacy and have to pay for them, they can be expensive, upwards of a couple hundred dollars each, so for them to be able to have this service brought to them is key."

Renown Health has a received $7.5 million  from the William N. Pennington Foundation to hire and retain pediatric doctors. 

On average in the U.S., there are 15 pediatricians for every 100,000 people, but in Reno, there are less than 10 pediatricians per that many residents.

That shortage is even more profound when you look at more specialized care.

Pages