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About a third of Americans living in rural areas say they probably or definitely would not get a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a recent analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation.


Last summer, I met up with Ben Barto outside the small town of Dubois, Wyo. He's a huge Trump supporter and we were having a conversation about where he thought America was headed. 

"Revolution," he said. "I think it's headed there."

A color coded US map highlighting different rural areas that do not have pharmacies designated to distribute COVID-19 vaccines.
Screenshot / RUPRI Center for Rural Health Policy Analysis

When the COVID-19 vaccines become more widely available, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will partner with retail pharmacies such as Costco and Walgreen to help distribute them. But a new analysis of rural counties finds that as many as 750 counties don't have one of those pharmacies.

COVID-19 infections are waning slightly in the rural U.S., but the number of deaths there is still climbing. 


The Rural West Covid Project was conducted back in June and July, when cases of the novel coronavirus were spiking across the country.

Nearly half of all counties in the Mountain West have largely been spared from COVID-19, according to recent data from the nonprofit organization USAFacts. Many of these communities weren't untouched, but all have had fewer than five confirmed cases of the virus. 

A pile of facial medical masks.
Nicole Miller / Fabrication Lab, University of Nevada, Reno

Health care workers across the nation are struggling with a shortage of personal protective gear, or PPE, as COVID-19 continues to spread across communities. In Reno, a network of makers is coming together to help fill those needs with 3D printing technology.

A row of individual mailboxes lined up in front of greenery.
Yannik Mika / Unsplash

The U.S. Postal Service is in trouble. It was already losing billions of dollars every year. Then COVID-19 happened.

The National Congress of American Indians warned reporters in a press conference Friday that COVID-19 is a “recipe for a disaster” for tribal nations. 

Nationwide, more and more people are surviving childhood. But researchers found those improvements might not be as big in rural areas. 

A report last year found that child mortality rates had improved. In fact, nationally, it looked like the country had met its 2020 goals. But then researchers took a closer look.