Senator Dean Heller

A group of people are sitting in the office of the Democratic Party of Wahoe County. They are making phone calls to registered Democrats to get them to vote in the midterm election.
Anh Gray

The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, united Republicans nationwide. In the last election, many GOP candidates promised to dismantle it. But that turned out to be a struggle and Democrats have now taken on health care as their key issue to drive out the vote this midterm. KUNR's Anh Gray has more.

NPR

The most recent effort by GOP leaders to partially repeal the Affordable Care Act failed to pass this week. For that vote, Republican Senator Dean Heller stuck with his party by supporting the ‘skinny repeal.’ Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray explores the possible impact of this vote on his political future.

In a dramatic upset, Arizona Senator John McCain and two other Republicans voted no on the skinny repeal.

Reporter Michelle Rindels is with The Nevada Independent. She says Senator Dean Heller won’t have to take heat for sticking with the majority of his party.

Paul Boger / Reno Public Radio

Nevada's Republican Senator, Dean Heller, is defending his vote to begin debate on the possible repeal of the Affordable Care Act. 

In a statement sent after Tuesday's vote, Heller told constituents that his decision to support the procedural motion is because the current law -- otherwise known as Obamacare -- is unworkable and that doing nothing was not the answer.

However, Heller went on to say that he would not vote in favor of the final health care bill if it "isn't improved for Nevada.” 

Getting broadband access to rural parts of the Silver State can take up to several years.  One big roadblock is government delays. Earlier this week, Nevada Senator Dean Heller asked Congress to speed things up. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports.

Congress is considering a bill to help the children of homeless veterans.  Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports Senator Dean Heller of Nevada is pushing to get this legislation passed.   

Nevada veterans currently wait an average of 248 days for a disability claim to be completed, making access to VA health care in this state one of the longest hold-ups in the nation.