snow

Two skiers stand on snowy mountains.
Amy Westervelt

Several feet of snow have fallen around the Lake Tahoe region but a report by the Department of Energy says Tahoe will see a significant decline of snow levels over the next 80 years. 

Bree Zender

After the first couple of storms of the winter season, much of the Eastern Sierra is at or above the historic median snow totals for this time of year, but areas in the Tahoe and Truckee Basins are trailing behind. KUNR's Bree Zender has more.

Patrick Nouhailler / Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0

Research by the University of Nevada, Reno and the University of Colorado, Boulder shows that rising temperatures are causing snow to melt earlier in the year, and that's not good news.

The Truckee Meadows depends on runoff from snowmelt to fill its reservoirs and streams for drinking, agriculture and recreation.

Rising temperatures are causing snow to melt earlier in the year, when days are shorter and there’s less sunlight to melt the snow. This slows down the process, which means evaporation increases and less water makes it to regional reservoirs.

Reno Gets More Snow Than Tahoe

Mar 28, 2016
Julia Ritchey

A snow storm warning remains in effect until early Wednesday for much of north central and northeastern Nevada.

As of Monday afternoon, the system had dumped six to as many as 14 inches around the Reno area according to National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Deutschendorf.

"We expected this snow several days in advance however the amounts came in much higher because the storm came in much stronger in the area, and the heavier snow persisted for several hours longer," he explained. "And it  happened right over the highest populated areas of Western Nevada."

City Backlogged Clearing Post-Storm Tree Limbs

Nov 13, 2015
Julia Ritchey

  The storm that hit Reno earlier this week caused a torrent of tree limbs to come down and the city is backlogged trying to remove them. Reno Public Radio's Julia Ritchey reports.

Overall, Monday's weather caused fairly insignificant impact to the city's tree canopy, with no entire trees falling but plenty of lost limbs.

Steve Churchillo is the city's chief arborist. He says contrary to what some may think, the limbs that fell were due to the weight of the snow and not the health of the tree.