St. Vincent's Food Pantry

More Fresh Produce Heading To Reno Food Pantry

Nov 25, 2015
Michelle Bliss

A charity in Reno recently partnered with the University of Nevada, Reno for a project they hope will make it easier for low-income families to access fresh, locally grown produce. Marcus Lavergne reports:

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada is working with UNR’s Desert Farming Initiative to build a new “hoop” house in Reno. There, they’ll grow fresh fruit and vegetables year round for some of Catholic Charities’ poverty programs, including St. Vincent’s Food Pantry.

Editor's Note: For this story, information about the Valley Fire was updated on September 15, 2015 at 2 p.m.

The Valley Fire has burned through 67 thousand acres in Northern California. Reno Public Radio’s Anh Gray reports a few Reno non-profits are mobilizing quickly to bring basic supplies to the thousands of people stranded at evacuation centers there.

People living in poverty in rural Nevada will have more access to food and other social support this summer.   

Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada, which runs the St. Vincent’s Food Pantry in Reno, recently received a $2 million grant from the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services.  The money will help St. Vincent’s to expand their services to an additional 11 counties across the state by August.

For the past month, St. Vincent's Food Pantry has seen a surge of new families showing up at its doors each day. Reno Public Radio's Michelle Bliss stopped by the organization's busy headquarters in downtown Reno this week to learn more about this growing local need.

Volunteers at the pantry's warehouse are always busy this time of year. While some are hauling pallets of canned and nonperishable food around on forklifts, others are assembling the hundreds of boxes given out to families in need each day.

Photo by Anh Gray

There’s an array of social support that a person living in poverty may need, like access to a shelter, a food pantry or health care. But actually getting those services can be challenging and time consuming. Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada began using a new photo ID system this month to make getting this type of help much easier.

On a typical day, roughly 800 people come through the doors of the St. Vincent’s food pantry in downtown Reno. Michael Robbins is one of about two dozen people waiting to pick up a box of canned foods and some fruit.

Photo by Anh Gray

There’s an array of social support that a person living in poverty may need, like access to a shelter, a food pantry or health care. But actually getting those services can be challenging and time consuming. Catholic Charities of Northern Nevada began using a new photo ID system this month to make getting this type of help much easier.